Category Archives: Recruiting Trends

Why Are Employers Struggling to Fill Jobs?

783af3a944ad479520b387ba941870cdMuch like Lazarus, the U.S. economy has made a spectacular comeback. Even as the skunk-like stench of the Great Recession lingers, the worst seems to be behind us (SEE FIGURE 1 BELOW)

Unemployment Rate

FIGURE 1: U.S. UNEMPLOYMENT RATE (10-YEAR)

A snapshot of the good news:

  • U.S. employers advertised the most open jobs in April 2015 than any time in the last 15 years.
  • The economy added 280,000 jobs in May 2015, beating forecasts of 225,000 jobs.
  • Job growth occurred across the board, even in retail, suggesting growing consumer demand.
  • Wages are up 2.3%, the first increase since the recession ended.

Typically, an economic recovery after a steep recession would mean that newly created jobs would fill up rapidly. There is usually pent-up demand among the unemployed and underemployed, as well as those biding their time to move up.

Why then, are so many jobs going unfilled?

  • In a U.S. Chamber of Commerce study, 53% of leaders at smaller businesses said they faced a “very or fairly major challenge in recruiting non-managerial employees.” In a survey of Inc. 5000 CEOs last year, 76% said that finding qualified people was a major problem.
  • According to a March 2014 CareerBuilder study, 50% of the companies reported unfilled positions due to a lack of qualified candidates. In the IT field, that number rose to 71%.
  • The construction industry in Wisconsin has 80,000 unfilled jobs. Just to give you a sense of how the tide has turned after the housing bust, contractors have begun showing up at competitors’ worksites to lure workers with higher pay.
  • Even the manufacturing sector is now affected by worker shortages. According to the Wall Street Journal, 75% of manufacturers surveyed were having trouble finding skilled production workers.
  • These stats are not a post-recession anomaly. In May 2011, 3 million jobs were unfilled even as millions of Americans were still out of work.

These numbers are troubling since there is a cost when jobs go unfilled. The CareerBuilder study stated that it costs companies $14,000 in revenue for every position that remains unfilled for 3 months. According to indeed.com, for the top 10 companies in the Dow Jones Index, the cost of unfilled jobs costs the U.S. $75 million in monthly GDP.

We have a lot of available labor that accumulated during the recession, and we now have jobs being created. But, these jobs and workers seem too shy to break the ice. When Clinton (Bill, not Hillary) ran for President, the slogan was “It’s the economy, stupid”. The stats above make me ask: “Is the economy stupid?”

More and more employers claim that several American workers do not have the skills to fill these newly created jobs.

So, is there really a “skills gap” at play here?

No, there is not a “skills gap.” There is, however, a training gap for employees and perception gap among employers.

First, let’s review the “perception gap.”

According to a 2014 labor survey65% of new executive assistant jobs require a bachelor’s degree, but only 19% of currently employed assistants have bachelor’s degrees. Therefore, about 81% of current executive assistants are unqualified for their own jobs, based on the degree requirement.

I have seen several excellent admins who do their jobs well and it is impossible to tell the ones with a degree from the ones without a degree. But as they often do, employers erect artificial barriers that block qualified employees from applying for jobs. Furthermore, employers often demand higher qualifications, but balk at paying based on those qualifications. So the logic goes thus: employers want someone with a college degree for a job that does not require it, but don’t want to compensate based on the degree since the job does not require it. This makes complete sense if you insane, but that may account for the gap between perceived worker availability and job vacancies.

Rather than just blaming a “skills gap,” employers would do well to hire based on a skill/experience/degree matrix rather than focus on just one aspect.

This does not, however, let job seekers off the hook.

Many workers believe that closing the gap between skills required and skills available is easy: back to school. If only life were that simple, they’d call it football.

Our education system is ill skilled to prepare workers for the workforce. According to a McKinsey study, while 72% of educational institutions believe recent graduates are ready for work, only 42% of employers agree.

I am not trying to devalue education, but the fact is that colleges were not set up to deliver job training. They were set up to teach you to think and to teach yourself. Besides, it takes a lot of review and revisions to adapt academic curricula to cater to the thousands who attend college. Often college degrees are permanent monuments to temporary knowledge.

Additionally, the jobs that exist today did not exist in the same form a decade ago – how many iPhone programmers did you know in 2005? Not many colleges can deliver the skills at short notice to find a job.

Job seekers also find it hard to pick an area to develop expertise in, especially when market demand is so unpredictable.

A few years ago, getting trained in print design was an easy ticket to a marketing job. Thanks to Mr. Jobs, those jobs were quickly replaced by interactive design. As a result, there was a shortage for graphics designers. However, it is not easy for former print designers to overnight become experts in interactive design. Besides, who knew that the design landscape would change so precipitously? There were plenty of Flash designers who were suddenly unemployed, and had to learn JavaScript, HTML5, etc. to remain viable and employable.

U.S. employers clearly have a role to play. In 2011, only 21% of workers surveyed by Accenture had received any formal training at work in the previous 5 years. Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder, surveyed more than 2,000 employers. While 80% say they were concerned about a skills gap, only 40% were doing anything about it. (SOURCE)

There are ways, however, for employers and employees to work on a training mechanism together. The following examples show a pattern:

  • As manufacturing in the U.S. rebounds, there is a shortage of welders and the average age of welders is 55. In order to increase labor supply, the American Welding Society encouraged its 70,000 members to tour high schools and explain the profession, spread the word about available high-paying jobs and even arranged for a nationwide exhibit on welding. As a result, in 2012-13, 80,000 kids completed welding courses up from 42,000 in 2009-10.
  • The state of South Carolina has worked with businesses to create apprentice programs so as to train its workforce. In 2007, only 90 companies participated and created 777 apprenticeships. In 2014, 670 companies participated to create 11,000 apprenticeships. The state has benefited from German companies like BMW and Bosch moving there, since those companies brought the German model of apprenticeships.
  • Shereef Bishay, once a lead software developer with Microsoft, has founded Dev Bootcamp, a for-profit enterprise that develops what Bishay calls “world-class beginners.” Rather than a degree, the school provides folks hands-on skills to get jobs. They learn from working professionals marketable skills like Ruby on Rails, HTML5, CSS and JavaScript.


While the labor supply and demand are out of sync after the Great Recession, writing off workers as unqualified or employers as stingy paymasters will solve nothing. “Skills Gap” is a fancy term, but the real solution is to invest in our workforce, and grow the number of market-ready employees. That way, rather than competing for a small yet qualified sliver, employers have a bigger collection of talent to pick from.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

Your Average Time to Hire – How Do You Measure Up?

Average Time to HireAfter a recent survey published by the Dice-DFH Vacancy Duration Measure revealed that on average it took 26.8 working days to fill jobs in February – up almost by a day compared to January, RecruitmentBuzz launched their own investigation into their reader’s average length of time taken to hire. So, they included it in their latest poll question – ‘What is your average time to hire?’

Unsurprisingly, only 10% of recruiters reported that on average, it took over 12 weeks between sourcing a candidate to actual point of hire. Unsurprisingly because as the war on talent and skills shortages continues to swell, it is very much doubted that hiring managers and businesses would keep candidates on a 3-month string!

So what about the other end of the spectrum? 27% of respondents agreed with the Dice report and revealed that it took only up to 4 weeks to hire a candidate. While this is great news for a candidate that may be desperate for a job, it is up for debate if the company that’s hiring has a very efficient and competent process or if they are hoping to fill a role as quickly as possible and not giving much thought to the skills behind the candidate until it’s potentially too late.

A further 27% of companies take a little longer, averaging an 8-12 week hiring process but the majority of recruiters (36%) agreed that 4-8 weeks is the usual time taken for a new hire to be made.

As a recruiter, it’s so important to understand the metrics behind your time to hire and look to improve it as qualified candidates continue to be in scarce supply. Look to adopt new technologies that can both speed up the process but also save money – techniques such as video interviewing. You should also strive to create the perfect job description and maintain regular contact with the candidates that you stamp with your employer brand.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

How HR Cloud Solutions Can Improve Your Recruitment and Hiring Process

How HR Cloud Solutions Can Improve Your Recruitment and Hiring ProcessIn today’s busy job market recruiters are constantly on the lookout for new technologies to make the hiring process faster, more efficient and better organized. From sourcing candidates to talent management, recruiters are now embracing cloud technologies, which help them streamline the hiring process and choose candidates that perfectly fit the offered positions. Why are cloud solutions important for recruitment? Read on to see how using the cloud can improve your hiring process.

1. Less paper for everyone

Cloud technologies digitize the recruiting process, helping companies to save money on printing and making their hiring process more environmentally conscious. Recruiting involves lots of paper – resumes, application forms, cover letters and assessments are all used during the initial screening and the interview.

Using apps based in the cloud, recruiters can digitize the whole process, allowing candidates to upload their documents and keep a close track on their progress in the application process.

2. Improved agility

In order to be successful, businesses need to move fast. Cloud technologies help recruiters access relevant data on demand, without the necessity to store all these files locally and get lost in the process of organizing them.

Data can be obtained across all devices, providing crucial HR information when recruiters need it. Where data was previously disparate and disconnected, stored on various computers and devices, now all of it is placed together – offering an easy way for large-scale analytics.

3. Easy implementation and updates

HR systems are usually slow and problematic to implement – there are contractors, consultants and customer services involved in the process. Cloud technologies are designed to complement, not replace the existing technologies, and are much easier to implement – they simply don’t disrupt business operations.

Implementing a cloud system for application processing takes just a few weeks and doesn’t involve any additional expenses that usually come with setting up recruitment systems.

4. Multiple talent pools

Sourcing talent is becoming increasingly complex and the digital revolution means that there are many different databases for housing candidate information, as well as many different places for reaching passive candidates.

An HR software solution in the cloud helps to combine all those potential hiring resources into one comprehensive candidate pool, which is perfect for measuring, tracking and reporting. Cloud-based solutions help recruiters to easily post job openings, create one portal for reaching multiple platforms and standardizing candidate information into a searchable and measurable source.

5. Improved analytics

The compilation of various resources into a single candidate pool helps recruiters to process applications faster and instantly spot top talents. Hiring managers can use insights from big data to produce relevant and targeted results, which help to find and compare top talents for a given position quickly.

Cloud computing solutions often offer built-in search technologies that are able to combine the employer’s profile, the language of job postings and global candidate databases into a simple resume compilation, which is totally searchable and available from any device connected to the internet.

Employers can consolidate internal and external databases and access several platforms at the same time – a great help in finding, developing and pipelining candidates.

All in all, cloud computing can make your life much easier – by having access to a constantly updated talent pool, you can use cloud applications to search for suitable candidates and streamline your hiring process, effectively coming up with better hiring solutions in a shorter time frame.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

Which Came First – Recruiting Analytics or Analytics in Recruiting?

Which Came FirstThe “which came first?” question is age old but lately I haven’t been thinking about it in terms of the chicken or egg, but in relation to recruiting and how it evolved to where it is today. You can’t think about the current state of recruiting without considering the thing that drives so many recruiters’ actions and helps those outside the profession understand what they do: analytics. It’s not only become a way for you to track and measure how you’re doing, but also to help your organization’s executives see the value you bring as well. But when it comes to analytic recruiting, which came first – recruiting analytics used to measure your efforts or analytics in recruiting used to guide what you do?

Rising to the challenge

As with any aspect of the business, it’s vitally important to be able to prove the value, worth and even cost savings that HR and recruiting provide. Specifically with recruiting, the challenge is to provide business leaders with actionable information that helps them make decisions about investments, marketing strategies and new products. But where does HR fit in since much of what we do isn’t easily linked to dollars and cents? Fortunately, while HR may not be about the numbers, recruiting is perfect for the analytics game. Analytics in recruiting are a viable way to quantify the cost and the impact of recruiting and hiring programs and even HR processes. By looking at analytics, we can measure the success, or failure, of initiatives and show business leaders what worked, what didn’t and what the next steps should be. They also enable companies to track year-to year-trends and changes to critical variables. HR and recruiting is about much more than just recruiting analytics, but the numbers provide a way for organizations to measure the value of the time and money spent on HR activities.

Before it all began

Analytics as a measurement tool are nothing new – they’ve always been a way to evaluate, prove and plan. However, they haven’t always been used so heavily to measure recruiting efforts. Recruiting has grown and evolved into more than just job postings. Recruiters have more ways to reach candidates, build relationships and create candidate pipelines. Most important to this conversation, they have earned the recognition in their organizations and with that came the expectation of providing analytics just like every other department in the company.

But if you think back to before that all began, when recruiting was low key and seen as more of a cost center than a revenue generator, recruiting was still driven by numbers. Recruiters may not have been providing robust reports to executives and may have had far fewer tools with which they could measure, but it was still all about the numbers. In fact, recruiting has a history of being sales focused, evaluating measurements like number of calls made, prospects engaged, conversions produced and even employees retained.

From the very beginning, recruiting has been about analytics. This simple fact proves that recruiters have been using analytics in recruiting far before they started using analytics to measure recruiting. So in the question of which came first, the answer has to be analytics in recruiting. Recruiters have been using metrics and analytics to demonstrate their sales effectiveness since the beginning of recruiting.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

4 Tips for Recruiting Generation Z

Recruiting Generation Z

Just when you’ve grown accustomed to Generation Y (Millennials in the workplace), HR leaders are being advised to prepare for the introduction of Generation Z to the workforce and their own demands. With millions of babies being born each day, this demographic will soon make up the largest segment of our populations. These young adults are often described as an “extreme version” of the Millennial, if you can imagine that. They live in a world where they need more than two devices to stay connected; they are speedy communicators and have an innate ability to be productive and to make an impact.

And they are dreamers looking to make a change. A study by New York-based marketing agency Sparks & Honey, found that 37.8% of Generation Z hope to “invent something that will change the world”. This enterprising and connected generation will radically change how HR recruits. Here are some top tips and technologies that will be commonly used to recruit them in the future:

1. Distraction: Gen Z-ers are constantly swapping between multiple devices and numerous digital tools which have enabled them to have tremendous skills in multi-tasking. They are dialed into all social media portals and they can use some sort of application for almost everything they do. It’s more important now than ever that your recruitment strategy is social and mobile. Applicant tracking systems will help enterprises to understand which channels Generation Z are using the most to connect with the company and optimize their recruitment strategies for these channels.

2. Visual: 20-somethings have a short attention span and are highly visual so consider how to make your brand standout through visual technologies. You could tweet a 6-second Vine video or upload a video to YouTube and tweet the link.

3. Technology savvy: This generation was born fully equipped with smart phones and tablets. They appreciate being flexible, adaptable, smart and fast. Therefore, if you haven’t already done so, it’s critical to have a mobile app, a mobile career site for candidate applications, videos, blogs and social updates, all with a simple look and feel. You should put emphasis on being agile and visual!

4. Collaboration: This population is extremely interactive, therefore you tailoring the way that you engage with them is important; they are highly expressive and prefer the interpersonal connection. This generation wants to get to know their peers, managers and leaders on an intimate level. They are also fantastic thought leaders, which make for excellent discussion! We know that live video interviewing is gaining popularity but, with this generation, it will be a must-have and they will expect to engage early on in the recruitment process. Sending SMS text notifications for interviews, sending feedback surveys, subscriptions to online blog communities, and social events are all great ways to keep this on-the-go candidate engaged and committed.

It’s important to start to prepare for Generation Z now as they may well be the change that so many businesses desperately need in increasingly digital, competitive and global environments.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

Talent Shortage – What Does It Mean For Employers?

Talent ShortageThe markets are at record highs while unemployment rates are consistently dropping. Does that mean we are in a candidate friendly market?

Listening to anecdotal information from recruiters, it certainly seems that way. But is there any additional data to support this argument?

HireRight recently conducted their annual Employment Screening Benchmark survey and found some interesting data points pertaining to this topic. While the report tends to focus on trends and best practices of background screening, the results also hint that we are, indeed, heading towards a candidate market.

They found that a sizeable majority of companies who responded (76%) plan to increase hiring in 2015. In fact, slightly more than a quarter of respondents expect to grow their workforce by 6% or more this year!

Survey respondents also indicated that most of this growth would come from new employees, rather than temps or contract workers. This suggests that employers are finally moving past the effects of the Great Recession.

Whether this will eventually sprout into a long-term employee bull market remains to be seen. However, job seekers can likely expect to find more employment opportunities in the near future. For employers, this has several, direct implications:

  1. Quality candidates will become increasingly difficult to source
    This is a simple matter of supply vs. demand. The demand is increasing as more employers look to increase their operations while the supply of available labor is steadily decreasing. The end result is that recruiters have to fight harder for a smaller number of available candidates. Simply posting an opening on the career page may no longer suffice. Instead, employers should develop more proactive recruiting strategies, such as engaging with potential candidates long before the actual job opening exists. In effect, a smaller talent pool will likely force increased foresight and planning on the part of the employer.
  2. 10,000 fewer employees per day
    It’s difficult to believe that just today, 10,000 baby boomers reached retirement age. And if that isn’t shocking enough, consider that this event will repeat itself every single day for the next 15 years! With them, they will also retire decades of accumulated work, managerial and leadership experience. Where does that leave employers? To fill their ranks, recruiters and hiring managers will need to leverage the new perspectives and fresh capabilities of the millennial generation.
  3. You’re spending more to hire
    Nevermind the cost of simply recruiting a new employee, estimated to be between 1.5x to 3x their annual wage. Average wages themselves are also starting to grow somewhat, up 2.1% in 2014. For employers, this is a double-whammy. Not only does it cost more to hire new workers, but existing employees also have more incentive to look for fresh opportunities. Which leads us to the next point….
  4. You’ll likely experience increased employee churn soon
    In such an atmosphere, even passive candidates – defined as those who are currently employed and not actively searching for a job – may take notice. If there are more job openings that offer higher pay, what should prevent them from evaluating their options? The government’s monthly “Quits” report seems to suggest that more employees are seeking voluntary separation from their employers. (The Quits report is commonly accepted as a proxy measure of the workforce’s job prospect sentiments.)
  5. Candidates will judge you more earnestly
    If workers have more employment opportunities, they will also become more discerning about their options. Such candidates will naturally judge their recruiting and interview experience with you more critically. This means that your organization probably can’t afford to offer a second-rate candidate experience. Especially if your competition is busy wowing their candidates. This means putting a human face on the recruiting experience, offering a mobile-friendly job search and application format, communicating about the status of the application, as well as simplifying and integrating the end-to-end application process (including the background screening aspects.) Unless, of course, you’re willing to settle for second-tier talent.

Given all of the above, it is not surprising that HireRight’s survey found that “finding, retaining and/or developing talent” was the number one business challenge cited by respondents.

recruiting-top-business-challenges-2015

In the rapidly approaching era of the talent shortage, employers will need to be prepared to ensure a great candidate experience if they expect to remain competitive.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

ZeroFeeRecruiter.com

Survival of the Fittest: 5 Recruiting Technology Trends Every Employer Needs To Know

The Evolution of Recruiting TechnologyIt’s no secret that the world of work has changed – but the fact of the matter is, recruitment, largely, remains stuck in stasis, with many employers failing to adopt the tools and technologies today that will be required to compete for – and win – top talent tomorrow.

While new systems and software can seem scary, the good news is that these tools can actually help handle some of the most manual and monotonous parts of the hiring process, like sifting through stacks of seemingly identical resumes and generic cover letters, freeing them so that they can focus on finding, engaging and attracting the best and the brightest candidates available.

As technology continues to advance and become even more omnipresent in our everyday lives, it’s up to recruiters to create scalable, sustainable strategies to reach today’s candidates in real time, all the time, no matter where in the world of work they happen to work. Because if you aren’t keeping pace, chances are, you’re already losing the competition for great candidates to those employers who aren’t stuck in the staffing stone age.

If you’re still relying on spreadsheets and a mostly manual hiring process that focuses on paperwork more than people, here are 5 hiring tools you can use to keep up with the times – and the competition.

1. Video Resumes

Employers aren’t the only ones trying to stand out from the increasingly cutthroat and competitive labor market; candidates are increasingly experimenting with new ways to get noticed beyond simply shooting resume after resume into an ATS and hoping to get a phone call.

Increasingly, this means reinventing the idea of a ‘resume’ altogether, and we’re not talking about switching to colored fonts, fancy card stock or unconventional formatting. We’re talking video.

The rise of video resumes might not be replacing the traditional paper based documents any time soon, but these do offer an ideal way to go beyond simply listing skills and experience to really showcase their soft skills and speak to culture fit, too. Many candidates, frustrated by the relative unresponsiveness of recruiters, often think that if only they could somehow get at least a look, they’d see what they’re really missing out on.

Well, now any candidate can get a look – and present themselves as more attractive potential hires by leveraging video to create a picture worth a thousand resumes. The good news for recruiters is that video resumes make assessing candidates easier for them, too – a rare example of a recruiting win-win.

2. Professional Networks

Yeah, social recruiting has become pretty passé by now, but professional networks have taken center stage in today’s talent acquisition process. These networks, LinkedIn being the most prominent example, are currently the fastest growing global source of hire, increasing 73% over the past 4 years alone.

This speaks to their increasing efficacy and mainstream adoption as a core component of the modern job search for candidates and employers alike.

While the most prominent social platforms like Facebook and Twitter can help recruiters and employers learn more about a candidate’s personality, professionalism and presentation style, professional networks were created primarily to connect job seekers with recruiters, employers and third party agencies, and have features and functions designed to facilitate that end goal not found on more traditional social networks. These features include the ability to apply directly for jobs or share referrals to their onsite social connections. These platforms present a powerful way to target and engage top talent while building a magnetic employer brand (and pipeline) for future hiring needs.

If you’re not making the most out of professional networks, you’re missing out on one of today’s most valuable recruiting resources – so make sure that this is one tool that’s always part of your toolbox.

3. Video Interviews

Video interviewing has seen a dramatic rise in adoption by employers, and not just for those looking for remote workers or considering candidates in different markets or regions. Video interviewing now offers both the ability to have a two way conversation between employers and employees as well as the chance to have candidates respond to preset questions that allow recruiters and hiring managers to screen whenever or wherever they want.

This one way video interviewing capability, at least, gives recruiters the chance to improve efficiency and increase their chances that no great candidates slip through the cracks by providing a powerful new way to watch up to watch up to 10 video interviews in the time it takes to perform a single phone screen. When it comes to productivity hacks, this one’s a no brainer.

Whether conducting one way interviews at your convenience or utilize video for live interviews, this emerging medium can assist employers in assessing not only a candidate’s body language and nonverbal cues sent when responding to certain questions, but also their overall presentation style, presence and professionalism, too. No more unpleasant in-person interviewing surprises is one outcome every recruiter should be eager to start seeing.

Video helps ensure that what you see, at least during the screening and selection process, is truly what you get when a candidate shows up on site.

4. Mobile Recruiting

Many of us are so glued to our mobile devices that they’ve more or less morphed into extensions of our bodies, an appendage that’s omnipresent no matter where we are or what we’re doing. In fact, those “Gen Y” workers recruiters seem so concerned with – the 18-36 year old demographic – check their smart phones an average of 43 times per day. With so much time spent basking in the glow of our mobile screens, it’s crucial that employers make sure they’re able to reach candidates there, too, and not have hiring remain chained to a desktop.

Not only are more job seekers using mobile devices to search for or browse job postings and career content, but they’re also increasingly demanding the ability to apply for those jobs on the go, too. Given this trend, it’s important to optimize your online career sites and employer branding initiatives specifically for these devices, creating a seamless and painless user experience for mobile users. Adopting mobile recruiting not only creates convenience and conversions, but improves candidate experience, too.

If you’re still not sure whether or not your hiring process is built for mobile, try applying for one of your open positions on a mobile device – and if you can’t, it’s probably time to start looking at new systems and solutions, stat.

5. Big Data and Analytics Solutions

Big data is making big waves, and big changes to the business of hiring and the recruiting industry in general. That’s because these concepts represent a powerful approach for adopting analytics to find better talent faster than ever before by provide insights and information to help recruiters recruit smarter.

Rather than spend your time manually reviewing a ton of resumes and dispositioning them one at a time, employers are increasingly adopting matching tools and technologies with specialized algorithms designed to search for and stack rank the most qualified candidates among the often hundreds of resumes flooding in for every open position. These programs leverage more than just resumes for generating results, though, and many incorporate a broad range of candidate related data, such as social profiles or automated assessment tools – to filter by skills and qualifications, too.

Big data allows recruiters to eliminate guess work and eliminate waste throughout the hiring process, from cutting down on paperwork to preempting poor hiring decisions by filtering out all but the most highly qualified candidates.

Sure, most of these sound like buzzwords, but that’s because they truly are a sign of the times – and if you’re stuck in the past, you’d better start adopting these technologies today, or lose out in the future war for tomorrow’s talent.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

Will Face-to-Face Interviewing Die Out?

Video-interviewingFace-to-face interviewing is under attack from video interviewing — just look at the statistics. Aberdeen Group has shown that while only 10% of companies used video interviewing in 2011, 42% were using it by 2012. As of January 2014, CNBC reports that roughly 63% of companies use video interviewing. Given the trends, it’s likely the number is even higher today.

As video interviewing rises to prominence, we have to ask: will the face-to-face interview die out completely, replaced by cheaper, more flexible video options?

If traditional interviewing does die out, it will be a gradual process. Video interviewing has become culturally accepted in the early stages of the interview process, and could quite plausibly become the norm. However, the majority of second interviews and negotiations are still conducted as face-to-face meetings. Employers feel they need face-to-face contact to make the appropriate emotional and psychological connections to fully assess the candidate.

In time, however, video interviews may become the norm for later stages of the interview process, too. Technological advances like broadband, 3G, 4G, HD technology, LED, and OLED have helped gradually reduce technophobia in the world, setting the stage for a widespread adoption of video interviews at all stages in the interview process.

Could the technology that would make video interviews acceptable in the second round one day arrive – for example, 3D holographic technology that would allow interviewers to interact with 3D holographic projections of candidates?

But, that’s the stuff of science fiction isn’t it? Not exactly: 3D holographic projections are here — though not yet available in the shops — and you can expect the technology to filter into corporate video-conferencing strategies over the next decade. Professor Roel Vertegaal of Queen’s University and his team have cooked up a 3D cylindrical model of a human being using little more than Microsoft Kinect sensors, a 3D projector, a 1.8 meter-tall translucent acrylic cylinder, and a convex mirror.

Now, imagine if recruiters could access such 3D holographic projections of their remote interviewees. Recruiters could see the candidates’ full body movements and assess their body language – something that is compromised in 2D video interviews.

It’s probably only a matter of time — 5-10 years – before 3D holographic projection technology makes it into the corporate sphere. When that happens, we might see 70, 80 or even 90% of first-round interviews conducted by 3D projection, as well as much higher percentages of second-round interviews conducted via holographic technology, especially in situations where employees will work remotely from other countries.

All this being said, there is probably little chance of face-to-face interviewing dying out completely. Still, 3D video interviewing may become an increasingly common practice, taking over much of the space normally reserved for face-to-face interviewing.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

3 Predictions About How Recruiting Will Change

Generation ZMillennials, generation Z, and social media: three predictions about how the recruiting and talent landscape will change. Read on:

As millennials enter managerial roles, workplace dynamics are sure to shift.

The millennial generation is one of aspiring leaders: globally, nearly 70% of millennials say that becoming a leader/manager is either important or very important. This has had implications for recruiters for many years, but now, as millennials are passing through the entry stages of their careers and actually becoming managers, it will have a significant impact on the workplace dynamics.

Millennials around the world are motivated to become leaders for different reasons – while high future earnings was the dominant theme globally in research we’ve done, others especially want opportunities to influence the organization. Interestingly, challenging work and decision-making power ranked lower on the list.

Understand the motivations behind leadership because this will impact how millennials actually lead. Millennial managers will be looking for opportunities to change areas of the business they feel are lacking. North American millennials are also highly interested in having the opportunity to coach and mentor others — so their management style will likely be much different from that of their managers. Simply put, as a new generation of candidates enter the workforce, they will face a totally different landscape than 5 or 10 years ago. While these changes could lead to positive developments in innovation and more open office cultures, they also open up the potential for friction among existing employees who might be resistant to the change.

Gen Z will bring completely new recruiting challenges and techniques.

For years, all we’ve heard about is the millennial generation — but now, as millennials leave school and advance in their careers, recruiters will inevitably shift their attention to Gen Z.

People have already begun speculating about what Gen Z is like, and how this generation is similar or different from the millennial generation. According to general data on this group, Gen Zers are more mature, more independent, and more diverse than their millennial counterparts. They are entrepreneurial and eager to make a difference in the world. They are also accustomed to communicating in short bursts and have low attention span.

Obviously, these are still preliminary conclusions — only time will tell how this group will shape up and impact the working world. Avoid generalizations, but some of this generational context might help to inform how recruiting techniques will need to change. A continued focus on leadership opportunities and entrepreneurialism will be important, as will an emphasis on the long-term mission of the organization. As technology continues to evolve, our communication will need to do the same — images will become more powerful than text, and the companies that communicate with students where they are will be most successful. This leads me to my last point …

Social media: The more you need to be active, the harder it will become.

We all know that talent is on social media — and if you’re not, you’re missing out on the opportunity to talk to a key talent pool. Employers know this, yet they continue to do the same things: thinking more content is better content, posting content that doesn’t resonate, and not understanding how candidates actually want to use social media for career content.

Here’s the problem: Facebook is crowded. It’s becoming flooded with noise. The average user has 1,500 posts queued up in their account each time they log in — and some especially well-connected users have up to 15,000! The amount of businesses and content on Facebook has made it an incredibly noisy space, and if you’re posting content, you’re fighting with other companies to reach the same talent (click on the waterfall images above).

To address this challenge, companies will need to become more and more strategic and deliberate in their social media efforts in 2015. Job content is not “thumb-stopping.” Your content needs to be real, authentic, data-led, and purposeful. Employers must use data to maximize the ROI on their social recruiting. This, coupled with smarter use of sponsored ads and targeting, will help employers to break through the noise on Facebook.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

4 Mobile Recruiting Mistakes You Can’t Afford To Make

Mobile RecruitingRight now, the U.S. has more Internet connected gadgets than people. Here’s an even more shocking statistic: just 33 percent of Fortune 500 companies have even the most basic mobile optimization on their career sites.

How is this possible? We spend more time with our smartphones than most of us do with family and friends. In fact, 91 percent of smartphone users have their device within reach at all hours of the day and night. Ignoring the power of mobile recruiting is no longer an option, yet many companies are still dropping the ball when it comes to attracting smart, mobile-obsessed talent.

Here are the four mistakes your company might be making when it comes to mobile recruiting:

Mistake 1: Not Optimizing Your Career Site For Mobile

Optimizing your career site for a mobile experience is the simplest step you can take to start attracting mobile job seekers, yet so many companies are failing at even this task.

In a recent survey, 61 percent of responders said they would immediately leave a site if it wasn’t formatted for mobile. Job seekers expect mobile optimization and decent loading times when viewing your company webpage. Not investing in mobile optimization can make your company appear hopelessly behind the times.

Consider retail giant Macy’s, which isn’t even a tech-centered organization. It currently receives about 25 percent of all applications through mobile. If you’re looking to hire tech superstars or great talent for your startup, mobile optimization is the first step. Plus, a mobile optimized career page can give you another platform to promote your company culture and the benefits of joining your organization.

Mistake 2: Your Application Process Is Too Complicated

Applying from a mobile device, especially a smartphone, is a whole different animal than applying for a job on a laptop or computer. The great job seekers you attract to your company might just throw in the towel if they see a job application that seems to go on forever.

Since you’ve optimized your career site for mobile users, it’s time to optimize your actual application as well. Include only the most relevant informational fields and make it easy for job seekers to fill out even on the smallest screens.

When applying for a job from a mobile device, candidates are looking for a company that makes the process simple. This is especially true for passive candidates, who might have found your position while idly scrolling through social media channels. These people aren’t going to stick around for a complicated, buggy application process. So think short and sweet–you won’t miss recruiting great passive candidates or smart, in-demand job seekers.

Mistake 3: No Mobile Interviewing

One of the biggest mistakes companies make in the mobile candidate hunt is to optimize the application process and then call it a day. Tech-savvy candidates, however, long to do more from their mobile devices than just apply. Currently, six out of 10 companies are utilizing video interviews in the recruiting process, but just as many should be utilizing the power of mobile interviewing.

Using a smartphone, candidates can record a video resume or answer written employer questions in a one-way video interview. These recorded answers can then be viewed on your mobile device at any time, in any place. This means if your ideal candidate is lounging on a beach somewhere, they can still take the interview from their mobile device.

Recruiting great candidates doesn’t end at the application process, and your mobile recruiting strategy shouldn’t either. By allowing for mobile video interviews, you’re branding your company as an organization that embraces new technology and looks to make life simpler for talented candidates.

Mistake 4: No Mobile Referral Program

Referral programs consistently bring in great talent for smart organizations willing to tap into the existing employee networks. So why not optimize your referral program for mobile usage? After all, when are your employees more likely to think of a great candidate: at their desk, or while speaking to their contact outside the office walls?

Last year, 70 percent of companies had low rates of hires and two-thirds were unhappy with their referral numbers. Once again, mobile optimization shouldn’t stop after the career page fits on a smartphone screen. Utilize easy-to-use referrals employees can tap into from their mobile devices the second they remember a talented contact perfect for your open positions.

With the number of mobile devices rising every day, it only makes sense for companies to adjust to mobile recruiting. Avoid the common mistakes, go beyond simple optimization, and you might soon find yourself recruiting the top talent you need.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, that are available in your location and that have agreed to your salary range. 

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out” and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

Yes, Our team is USA based!