Monthly Archives: May 2015

6 Must-Knows for a Better Candidate Experience

Business man carefree outstretched armsWe’ve talked before about how devastating ignoring candidates can be to your business — and guess what? The rules haven’t changed. If anything, as technology continues to be more and more intertwined in job seekers’ personal and professional existence and as their expectations of employers get higher, it’s all the more vital that you as an employer learn how to communicate with the people who want to work for you.

Or, you know, don’t — but don’t say we didn’t warn you…

CANDIDATES ARE YOUR CUSTOMERS

The experiences candidates have throughout the application process can make or break their impression of a company, as a new CareerBuilder study shows. Not only may candidates be so turned off by a bad experience that they’ll opt out of applying — they may also choose to stop being your customer (and may tell others to do the same).

The 2015 Candidate Behavior study, conducted by Inavero on behalf of CareerBuilder, surveyed more than 5,000 workers and 2,000 hiring decision makers about the hiring experience. The study sheds light on the differences between what candidates expect from potential employers during the job application process — and what employers actually deliver.

Did I mention those differences are quite vast?

So what do you need to know right now about the candidate experience to help you better meet their expectations and get more great people applying to – and happy with – your company?

1. CANDIDATE EXPERIENCE CAN IMPACT YOUR BOTTOM LINE.

Though 82% of employers think there’s little to no negative impact on their company when a candidate has a bad experience, 58% of candidates are actually less likely to buy from a company if they don’t get a response to their application.

Conversely, 69% of candidates are more likely to buy from a company if they’re treated with respect throughout the application process.

2. YOU NEED TO USE DATA TO REALLY CONNECT WITH CANDIDATES.

Even though candidates consult up to 18 resources throughout their job search — including job boards, social networking sites, search engines and online referrals — 58% of employers don’t use tracking or coding technology to learn where their candidates are coming from. Consequently, they may be missing opportunities to connect with candidates where they are actually searching.

3. CANDIDATES PREFER BAD NEWS TO NONE AT ALL.

For some candidates, the myth of the infamous application “black hole” is all too real. 52% of employers say they respond to less than half of the candidates who apply, which is problematic: Not only do most candidates expect an automated reply that acknowledges their application, the majority (84%) also expect a personal email response (even if the news is negative).

4. ONGOING COMMUNICATION IS CRITICAL FOR CANDIDATES.

When it comes to candidate communication, many employers are falling way short. Even though 41% of candidates expect to be notified post-interview if they weren’t chosen for the job, 73% of candidates who interviewed with companies said they were never given an explanation of why they didn’t get the job.

5. CANDIDATES WANT YOU TO BE PERSONAL AND SIMPLE.

When it comes to keeping candidates engaged and interested in their opportunities, a company’s application process can be its own worst enemy. 40% of candidates feel the application process has become more difficult in the last five years. Of those, 57% complain the process is too automated and lacks personalization.

6. CANDIDATES MAY BE WILLING TO ACCEPT LOWER SALARIES.

As noted earlier, treating candidates well is good for the bottom line. More than 3 in 4 candidates (77%) are willing to accept a salary that is 5% lower than their expected offer if the employer created a great impression through the hiring process; even more (8%) would do the same if the company had a reputation as a great employer.

These findings underscore the importance of having a strong employment brand. Even so, 52% of employers do not have one, giving the other 48% a distinct edge when it comes to capturing in-demand candidates at competitive prices.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

What Do You Do When Job Candidates Ask About the Background Check?

Screening CandidatesMost job candidates will have many questions for an employer throughout the hiring process — including questions about the employment background check.

Do you have the answers?

Ultimately, knowing these answers benefits you, your company, and the candidates. Being transparent throughout the hiring process as a whole, and especially during the background screening process greatly affects your candidate experience.

Here are questions that you should be prepared to answer about your background checks:

Why does your company use pre-employment screening?

The reasons employers use employee background checks can vary — from protecting clients to enhancing workplace safety to identifying the best candidates.

Whatever your reason, sharing this with your job candidates will help set them at ease. They should know that you’re not trying to disqualify them, but instead you want to find the information that will help you make a smart hiring decision.

What kind of information are you looking for?

This answer will again vary depending on your company’s hiring policy, the position and federal and state screening laws.

Every company is different — and no two background checks will look alike. Because your company should have its own customized screening services, make sure you’re open with your candidate about the kind of information you’re looking for.

If you’re searching for criminal records, explain to candidates that you want to protect your company, clients and other employees, and ensure that a potential employee does not have a past that could affect their job.

If you’re searching for resume discrepancies, explain that it’s not uncommon for minor discrepancies to be uncovered — such as dates of employment. However, also let them know if a larger discrepancy like claiming a degree they have not earned will affect your decision.

In short, regardless of the specific information you’re searching for — tell your candidates. Helping them understand why you’re looking for specific information will build trust and put them at ease about the screening process.

How long is the background screening process?

There’s no easy answer for this one, as it largely depends on the information you request in your background checks.

If you’re conducting a criminal background check, this will depend upon how many counties you’ve requested and how long it takes those courts to respond to a possible criminal hit. Employers should be in contact with their background screening provider, as they should be able to communicate if there’s a delay for any reason.

Another aspect that might affect turnaround time is if an education or employment verification is requested. For example, a more extensive employment history might also cause a delay.

Will anything you find disqualify me for the job?

Depending on state or federal screening laws, you may or may not be able to conduct a background check until later in the hiring process. Regardless of when you request a background check, it’s essential to be clear with candidates if there’s a particular record that might disqualify them.

It’s also crucial that your company hiring policy should clearly outline the type of criminal record or resume discrepancy that would disqualify a candidate — unless you want to find yourself in the middle of a lawsuit.

It’s also important to note that many employers actually prefer that a candidate be up front about their criminal past. While this is not always possible due to ban the box laws, if you’re able to ask for disclosure before the background check, clearly communicate your company policy for hiring candidates with a criminal record.

Will I be notified if something is found?

If a criminal background check uncovers disqualifying information on your candidate, you are required by law to send a pre-adverse and adverse action notification. While your background screening company was in compliance and verified the information there are still cases when a criminal record might be incorrect.

For example, if a record was expunged, but it was still reported, it’s vital that your candidate have the opportunity to dispute the information. Let candidates know that if information is found that they believe to be untrue, they will be notified and have sufficient time to make a dispute.

If you’re unsure about how to comply with the two-step adverse action notification, contact your background screening provider for legal counsel.

When all is said and done, your candidate experience will only be as good as your transparency about the background check process.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

 

How HR Cloud Solutions Can Improve Your Recruitment and Hiring Process

How HR Cloud Solutions Can Improve Your Recruitment and Hiring ProcessIn today’s busy job market recruiters are constantly on the lookout for new technologies to make the hiring process faster, more efficient and better organized. From sourcing candidates to talent management, recruiters are now embracing cloud technologies, which help them streamline the hiring process and choose candidates that perfectly fit the offered positions. Why are cloud solutions important for recruitment? Read on to see how using the cloud can improve your hiring process.

1. Less paper for everyone

Cloud technologies digitize the recruiting process, helping companies to save money on printing and making their hiring process more environmentally conscious. Recruiting involves lots of paper – resumes, application forms, cover letters and assessments are all used during the initial screening and the interview.

Using apps based in the cloud, recruiters can digitize the whole process, allowing candidates to upload their documents and keep a close track on their progress in the application process.

2. Improved agility

In order to be successful, businesses need to move fast. Cloud technologies help recruiters access relevant data on demand, without the necessity to store all these files locally and get lost in the process of organizing them.

Data can be obtained across all devices, providing crucial HR information when recruiters need it. Where data was previously disparate and disconnected, stored on various computers and devices, now all of it is placed together – offering an easy way for large-scale analytics.

3. Easy implementation and updates

HR systems are usually slow and problematic to implement – there are contractors, consultants and customer services involved in the process. Cloud technologies are designed to complement, not replace the existing technologies, and are much easier to implement – they simply don’t disrupt business operations.

Implementing a cloud system for application processing takes just a few weeks and doesn’t involve any additional expenses that usually come with setting up recruitment systems.

4. Multiple talent pools

Sourcing talent is becoming increasingly complex and the digital revolution means that there are many different databases for housing candidate information, as well as many different places for reaching passive candidates.

An HR software solution in the cloud helps to combine all those potential hiring resources into one comprehensive candidate pool, which is perfect for measuring, tracking and reporting. Cloud-based solutions help recruiters to easily post job openings, create one portal for reaching multiple platforms and standardizing candidate information into a searchable and measurable source.

5. Improved analytics

The compilation of various resources into a single candidate pool helps recruiters to process applications faster and instantly spot top talents. Hiring managers can use insights from big data to produce relevant and targeted results, which help to find and compare top talents for a given position quickly.

Cloud computing solutions often offer built-in search technologies that are able to combine the employer’s profile, the language of job postings and global candidate databases into a simple resume compilation, which is totally searchable and available from any device connected to the internet.

Employers can consolidate internal and external databases and access several platforms at the same time – a great help in finding, developing and pipelining candidates.

All in all, cloud computing can make your life much easier – by having access to a constantly updated talent pool, you can use cloud applications to search for suitable candidates and streamline your hiring process, effectively coming up with better hiring solutions in a shorter time frame.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

Can You Tell When Your Candidates Are Lying?

Can You Tell When Your Candidates Are Lying?According to a study carried out by the University of Massachusetts, the majority of people cannot hold a ten minute conversation with a stranger without fibbing at least once. Therefore, realistically speaking you’ll hear (and will have heard) a few porkies during your time in recruitment while interviewing candidates.

But fear not – it’s not all doom and gloom. You can become savvier to dishonesty from your candidates, and it’s not as difficult as you may think. The ball’s in your court on the severity of the lie and how you proceed thereafter. Is it a small fib where the candidate is enhancing their responsibilities in a previous role when interviewing for a more senior position? Or is it a big one like covering up a dismissal or a record in their criminal history? Arm yourself with the knowledge to spot a liar- here are some simple pointers to expose untruths:

Body language

You don’t need to be a body language expert to notice changes – however subtle – in a person when they’re not being entirely honest. You may literally notice them squirm with discomfort as they try to construct an answer or even shuffling their feet could be a sign that they want to walk away from the situation. Any notable change of or unnatural movements can signify that the candidate is preparing to lie to you such as, wringing their hands, gripping the arms of a chair, picking at skin or moving their head as they search the room for an answer. Liars will often try to ‘cover up’ that they’re being dishonest and will move their hands near their mouth, across their chest, throat or shoulders.

Eye contact

It’s said that the eyes are the windows to the soul. They’re also great indicators of how honest a candidate is being. Classic signs would be staring at the floor when asked a ‘tricky’ question while in a 180° turn, an accomplished liar will uncomfortably hold your gaze as if meeting the challenge head on. The best thing to do is establish what you think is normal eye movements for the candidate. Before you get down to their work history and role specific questions; ask something that doesn’t require lots of thought to answer. It could be something as simple as “how long did it take you to get here?” “what did you do at the weekend?” or “do you have any plans for the rest of the day?”. Unaccomplished liars will panic and their eyes may move wildly across the room as they seek out what they think is a satisfactory response.

Voice

Most people incorrectly assume a high-pitched voice is a sure fire way to identify when someone isn’t being truthful. Yes, your voice can become raised or high pitched due to the stress of lying increasing the heart rate. But it could also be the stress of an interview! However, suddenly dropping an octave, pausing or a change in speed can signal that the answer isn’t coming naturally.

Too much info!

Occasionally, if someone is lying they will trip themselves up by leaving you utterly confused by what you’ve just heard. A seasoned liar will have answers prepared for particular topics and will think he/she is covering their back well and creating false trust by going into great detail and volunteering information you haven’t asked for. This is a distraction method – attempting to take your mind off a topic they don’t want to discuss in the hopes of avoiding difficult questions. If you think this is happening; listen to your candidate’s answer then go back and ask for the original information you wanted. Less experienced liars will be more likely to babble – they won’t be able to confidently direct the conversation and there will be lots of opportunity to interject and ask questions.

Remember, candidates will be nervous about being in an interview where they’re essentially being judged and analyzed by strangers so some allowances should be made for the situation. However, if you notice a candidate behaving unnaturally, it should raise a flag. Do you want your client to hire someone and second guess their every word? Your gut should help you.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

What to Look for When Hiring Your First Employees

Hiring Your First EmployeesThe first few employees at your startup are crucial. They set the tone for your company and determine whether you fade out or make it to the next level.

“Hiring the right people is absolutely critical in the beginning, because each person you add will have a significant impact on shaping what will—and won’t—be valued, and how people will behave,” says Chris Cancialosi, founder and managing partner of gothamCulture, a New York-based organizational consultancy.

Cancialosi answers questions about attracting and selecting employees to create the right corporate culture from the start.

How can founders hire for a corporate culture that doesn’t yet exist?

You have to be very clear about your values. You need to sit down and say, “This is how I think business should be done, this is what’s really important to me, and this is what my company is going to stand for.” These are critical points that people need to identify but rarely do. As a founder, you have to determine what “right” looks like before you can build a team around it.

What makes those qualities evident in early hires?

I believe in attitude over experience. You can train people to do tasks, but you can’t train them to have the right attitude and values. We have a rigorous, five-stage recruiting and selection process that every employee goes though. There are specific things we look for, and we make it very laborious for them, so the people who aren’t truly interested just kind of self-select out. We’re assessing for those values and intangible qualities that are not found on a résumé.

What about diversity?

One mistake founders often make is to look for people who are clones of themselves. While that helps in aligning behaviors, the downside is that you look at every problem through the same set of glasses and leave yourself open to a lot of risk. Hiring people with diverse viewpoints will help mitigate that risk.

How do you attract those first employees before the cash gets flowing? 

There’s no blanket incentive that works for everyone. Equity stakes—giving them a piece of the company—always gets people’s attention. Some people value a flexible work schedule; some are totally incentivized by cash. You have to consider what motivates different people.

At gothamCulture, everyone is on a partner track, so they all see that long-term goal. We provide short- and long-term incentives in terms of bonuses for the people who are cash-incentivized. We basically have unlimited vacation: Our people work hard and have clear goals, and they’re compensated on hitting those goals. So if they need vacation, they take vacation, and nobody asks questions. We also have an open compensation model so everyone knows what everyone else makes; there’s no jockeying or negotiating for salary. We try to do things that appeal to a broad range of individuals.

Can just one or two founders create an effective hiring process?

It’s hard because there are only so many gates you can put people through. But you can still create a process to screen every potential hire. As candidates progress through our cycle, each event is designed for a specific reason. There might be tests to see if they can do the basics of the job, and there are behavior-based interviews to assess for values and culture fit. It’s important to identify the skill sets and values that will make people successful in your business, and then be very intentional about assessing those assets throughout your recruiting process.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

3 Ways to Attract Top Tech Talent

3 Ways to Attract Top Tech TalentBusiness success in the tech industry depends on attracting highly skilled employees, and it’s challenging for hiring managers to find themselves competing against other companies to win the interest of the best candidates.

The President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology predicts a drastic shortage of over 1 million tech workers in the decade between 2012 and 2022; if these statistics reflect anything even close to real-world numbers, that means these job-seekers (especially the ones with high-level skills) have the ability to pick and choose among employers. In order to build and maintain a solid talent base, you need to know what qualities in a company matter most to job seekers in the tech field. Below is a quick overview of how to make your company be more desirable to applicants.

1. Facilitate a Healthy Work-Life Balance

When millennials were polled about their career hopes, a satisfying work-life balance was consistently mentioned as the number one priority. No other workplace quality mattered more than this to young workers looking to start their careers. What does this mean for you in terms of establishing policies? Essentially, it translates into embracing flexibility. Attractive policies may include allowing workers to set their own hours, in order to accommodate family demands. Many employers offer the option of working from home, at least some of the time. Other ways to help employees balance their job and family needs include on-site childcare and recognition that working overtime does not produce positive outcomes.

2. Challenge Your Workers

Skilled workers in the United States place “being challenged” high on their wish list of qualities for the ideal job. This doesn’t mean imposing long, exhausting workdays, however. Instead, “being challenged” refers to making use of the employee’s full skillset, so that he or she gains an increased sense of being valued through solving difficult problems. One way that employers facilitate workers using their highest and best skills is to offer training opportunities. Supporting your staff to upgrade their knowledge will win loyalty as well as give you a more effective workforce. Tech employers recognize this reality, and corporate training expenditures rose by 15% in 2013.

3. Integrate Marketing and HR

Your company’s marketing professionals are abundantly familiar with the methods of sharing information that will draw customers to your product or service. These are your in-house experts at branding, and part of your job as a hiring manager is to promote your employer brand. Linking the know-how of your marketing staff with the HR managers — responsible for creating and publishing job listings — is a good way to make sure that your jobs reflect the true appeal of your company as an innovative, appealing employer.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

11 Things Recruiters Do That Scare Off Candidates

11 Things Recruiters Do That Scare Off CandidatesWhen thinking about the recruitment process, the candidate’s behavior is often considered more important than the recruiter’s. The candidate may want the job, but the recruiter wants someone to fill the position just as badly. If the recruiter doesn’t pay attention to their own behavior, she risks giving the wrong impression of the company, or even scaring the candidate off entirely. By avoiding the following behaviors, you can attract candidates and give the best impression of yourself and your business.

1. Not Arriving on Time or Being Rushed

It’s important for the candidate to show they’re serious about the role by arriving for an interview on time, but this also goes for the recruiter. Remember, an interview is an opportunity for your candidate to decide whether they want to work for your company. First impressions count both ways.

2. Not Being Prepared

Speaking of impressions, it bodes badly if recruiters aren’t prepared for the interview. If they spend the first few minutes of the interview reading over a resume, it shows that they aren’t taking the hiring process seriously. Make the time and do your homework on your candidates, and show them that you’re serious about considering them for the job.

3. Being Inappropriate

The culture in your workplace may be informal, but don’t let it bleed into your interview. You may think that casually cursing or over-sharing with your candidate shows that your company is an easygoing and friendly place to work, but it can actually send the message that you don’t take your work seriously. It can also make your candidate wonder what it’s like to actually work with you. You can make the candidate aware of the office culture, but don’t overdo it.

4. Not Knowing Enough About the Position

If you’re going to decide whether the candidate is the right fit for the role offered, you’re going to need to know exactly what that role is. Merely skimming the job description before entering the interview won’t be enough. Not having this knowledge shows disrespect to candidates too, as they’ve put in the time and effort to prepare for the interview, and their time is just as precious as the recruiter’s. Make sure you know exactly what you need from candidates before you meet them.

5. Not Taking Notes

You may feel that you can conduct the interview without jotting down any notes, but your candidate may think differently. Not taking notes shows that you can either remember everything perfectly, or that you aren’t interested, and no one will think it’s the former. The candidate may draw the conclusion that you don’t care about the people they’re interviewing that day, and that the job’s not important. Do yourself a favor and grab a notepad and pen before entering the interview room.

6. Dragging Out the Interview Process

Depending on the role on offer, there may be several checks and interviews you have to do before you can offer a candidate a job. However, if they’re already experienced and you’re putting them through multiple tests, they could well be turned off by your company. They’ve already proven their worth and gained their experience elsewhere. Avoid dragging out the process and potentially frustrating an excellent candidate.

7. Not Listening to What They Have to Say

To decide whether you want a candidate, you need to let them tell their story and demonstrate just why you should hire them. However, many recruiters make the mistake of taking over the conversation and making it about themselves. Make sure the conversation is actually a two-way dialogue, and allow candidates to sell themselves.

8. Not Advertising the Role Properly

Attracting the best candidates means writing the best ad you possibly can. If your ad is poorly worded, too vague or full of meaningless buzzwords, then many candidates will stay away. Give enough information to entice candidates to apply, and make it precise enough to attract the right people for the role. Take APG Exhibit’s employment page, for example. It lists quantifiable, minimum requirements while also sharing the benefits, including the opportunity to work from home. It also has a very visible “Apply Now” button that clearly directs visitors to the next step.

9. Listing Too Many Requirements

On the other hand, it’s tempting to write a detailed, exhaustive list of all the qualifications your candidates should have. Resist this temptation, as being too specific in what you want can turn candidates away. People won’t apply for the role if they feel they can’t fit a precise specification of a dream candidate that could only exist in a fairy tale. Keep your expectations realistic and list only the essential requirements.

10. Not Keeping an Open Mind

You may get applications from candidates that may not entirely match your specifications, but don’t dismiss them out of hand. Sticking rigidly to a defined set of rules can mean that you’ll let fantastic candidates slip through your fingers. Remember, the experience an applicant has may translate well into a different role. Keep an open mind and you’ll find you’ll have a much wider pool to work with.

11. Not Keeping in Touch

Anyone who’s ever interviewed for a job knows how awful it is waiting for a response. If you neglect to keep your candidates in the loop, they may well go looking for better offers by the time you get around to them. Conversely, make offers of work too soon and it can seem that you’re looking for any warm body to fill the role. Keep them informed of your process, and they’re more likely to keep you in mind as a potential employer.

Most of the above is common sense, but it can lost in the chaos that is hiring a new employee. Remember that your candidates are human, and they’re sizing you up just as much as you them, and you’ll be able to attract the best people for the job.

Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

Which Came First – Recruiting Analytics or Analytics in Recruiting?

Which Came FirstThe “which came first?” question is age old but lately I haven’t been thinking about it in terms of the chicken or egg, but in relation to recruiting and how it evolved to where it is today. You can’t think about the current state of recruiting without considering the thing that drives so many recruiters’ actions and helps those outside the profession understand what they do: analytics. It’s not only become a way for you to track and measure how you’re doing, but also to help your organization’s executives see the value you bring as well. But when it comes to analytic recruiting, which came first – recruiting analytics used to measure your efforts or analytics in recruiting used to guide what you do?

Rising to the challenge

As with any aspect of the business, it’s vitally important to be able to prove the value, worth and even cost savings that HR and recruiting provide. Specifically with recruiting, the challenge is to provide business leaders with actionable information that helps them make decisions about investments, marketing strategies and new products. But where does HR fit in since much of what we do isn’t easily linked to dollars and cents? Fortunately, while HR may not be about the numbers, recruiting is perfect for the analytics game. Analytics in recruiting are a viable way to quantify the cost and the impact of recruiting and hiring programs and even HR processes. By looking at analytics, we can measure the success, or failure, of initiatives and show business leaders what worked, what didn’t and what the next steps should be. They also enable companies to track year-to year-trends and changes to critical variables. HR and recruiting is about much more than just recruiting analytics, but the numbers provide a way for organizations to measure the value of the time and money spent on HR activities.

Before it all began

Analytics as a measurement tool are nothing new – they’ve always been a way to evaluate, prove and plan. However, they haven’t always been used so heavily to measure recruiting efforts. Recruiting has grown and evolved into more than just job postings. Recruiters have more ways to reach candidates, build relationships and create candidate pipelines. Most important to this conversation, they have earned the recognition in their organizations and with that came the expectation of providing analytics just like every other department in the company.

But if you think back to before that all began, when recruiting was low key and seen as more of a cost center than a revenue generator, recruiting was still driven by numbers. Recruiters may not have been providing robust reports to executives and may have had far fewer tools with which they could measure, but it was still all about the numbers. In fact, recruiting has a history of being sales focused, evaluating measurements like number of calls made, prospects engaged, conversions produced and even employees retained.

From the very beginning, recruiting has been about analytics. This simple fact proves that recruiters have been using analytics in recruiting far before they started using analytics to measure recruiting. So in the question of which came first, the answer has to be analytics in recruiting. Recruiters have been using metrics and analytics to demonstrate their sales effectiveness since the beginning of recruiting.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…