Monthly Archives: June 2015

5 Signs Your Recruiting Team Is Drowning in Social

Drowning in SocialSocial media seems so straightforward – and it follows that recruiting via social media ought to be straightforward too. Unfortunately, nothing is further from the truth. There is great competitive advantage to be had from mastering social recruiting approaches, but many recruiting teams are simply drowning when it comes to having social media produce genuine recruiting results.

Here are 5 telltale signs to help you determine if your company’s recruitment team is drowning in social:

  1. There’s no clear candidate targeting. What types of candidates are you trying to reach? Passive? Active? What are their job titles? Which competitors are you eager to target? Which types of roles are you best placed to fill via social media? If this hasn’t been clearly documented and communicated to all your recruiting team, how can you expect everyone to be pulling in the same direction on social?
  2. There’s no coherent message. What makes people choose to work for your company rather than your competitors? What types of people does that suggest you need to be appealing to? Has your messaging been optimized to consistently appeal to this demographic? Most importantly, has this been communicated to all your recruiting team so that everyone’s updates reinforce the wider company message you want potential candidates to see in the marketplace?
  3. There’s no conversion strategy. Once you’re winning followers and interacting with the types of candidates you’d like to hire, what conversion process have you put in place to turn possible interest into concrete actions that candidates take to bring them into your hiring funnel? (P.S. simply sharing your latest jobs with them falls way short of what’s needed).
  4. There’s no test, learn, test process. From the content you share… to the messaging you use… to the social media advertising you pay for – every element of social recruiting can be tested and perfected. Getting consistently better results means you have to be constantly testing out new approaches, new messages, new conversion strategies – and then adjusting your social approach based on what’s working best.
  5. There’s no dedicated resource. Are there people in your business dedicated to mastering each social site and whose time is allocated to building your social recruiting capability? If not, this is a sure-fire way to have your team drown in social. It’s commonplace that recruiters are tasked with developing a social recruiting brand presence and trying out social approaches alongside their regular day job.

The problem is, these side responsibilities are always the first things to be sacrificed and so the company never really builds any momentum or generates the necessary degree of expertise in social recruiting. You simply must have some dedicated resource – either in-house or by buying it in from external social media experts.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

How to Effectively Manage Your Recruitment Process

Manage Your Recruitment ProcessSomething that doesn’t get enough attention when thinking about recruitment is that, for the majority of people who attend an interview with your business, it will be their only direct interaction with your company.

How they are treated throughout that process, good or bad, will form not only their view of your business but indirectly your ability to attract good people in the future.

The most common complaints candidates make about a recruitment process are:

  • They didn’t receive any feedback from the interview
  • The process dragged on
  • If they had known more about the role, they wouldn’t have attended the interview and the interview was a waste of time

All of which are very avoidable if you take some time to effectively plan the recruitment process.

The key areas you need to think about when planning your recruitment include:

  • Time frame
  • Job description
  • Interview process & feedback
  • Offer, contracts and induction period

Time Frame

Setting a time frame is important because it gives everyone a deadline to work towards and it will help you:

  • Differentiate between what is desirable criteria and what is essential criteria
  • Determine what kind of process you need to run, and
  • Create a sense of urgency

A simple start point is:

  • Start date – X
  • Offer accepted, and resignation – Allow for 28 days (in most cases for permanent positions)
  • Offer made and contract out to candidate – Allow for 2 days
  • Final Interview – Allow for 1 day
  • Each interview prior to that – Allow for up to a week
  • Short list – Allow for up to a week between short list and first interview
  • Search stage – Allow for 2 weeks
  • Brief agency / internal recruitment team

Job Description

Despite having the ability to add a significant amount of value to the recruitment process, job descriptions are often at worst neglected and at best generic.

While it is probably the last thing you want to allocate time to, especially if someone has just resigned, taking the time to prepare a detailed job description will allow you to effectively:

  • Evaluate what is absolutely essential criteria for a position and what is desirable
  • Help differentiate your job from the 100’s of similar positions on the market
  • Minimize the risk someone will either interview for, or worse, accept a position with your business that they otherwise wouldn’t have had they known more
  • Give candidates and the recruiter reference material to work off when preparing for an interview or submitting candidates on a short list

As part of the process of putting together a job description, if you do decide to use a recruiter, it is a good idea to sit down with them to get a feel for:

  • What talent is currently available in the market and how realistic your expectations are with respect to time frame and salary
  • What compromises on the job description and desirable experience you can make to make to secure someone in a shorter amount of time or for lower salary
  • Options regarding temporary and contract staff to afford you more time to find the perfect candidate

Interview Process & Feedback

Regardless of if you want 1 interview or 10 interviews the key points you need to address to run a successful interview process include:

  • Setting clear expectations of exactly what each candidate will need to complete prior to receiving an offer and in what order, i.e. X amount of interviews, technical test, references offer, etc.
  • When and where each stage will take place
  • What information you want to get out of each candidate at each stage, as well as what information you want to give each candidate and at each stage
  • When feedback will be given to candidates either directly, via a recruiter or HR

Candidates set aside a considerable amount of time to both prepare for and attend an interview, not to mention often arranging time off work to do so.  For that reason it is no surprise that the most common complaint recruiters will get from candidates who attend an interview is that they didn’t receive feedback.

Providing constructive feedback to candidates (as well as recruiters) will ensure:

  • Regardless of the outcome candidates will, including unsuccessful ones, exit the process with a positive impression of the business
  • Candidates that are progressing are able to address any areas of concern in future interviews, giving you more information to make a decision
  • Provide the recruiter with valuable feedback on the candidates they have presented to the business improving their performance on the current and future roles they recruit for you

Offer, Contracts and Induction Period

The most common mistakes that lead to candidates turning down an offer:

  • Salary is less than what they wanted
  • Candidate’s personal situation changes, including being offered a job they are more interested in
  • Business takes too long to either offer the position or get a contract out to the candidate

If you confirm a candidate’s salary expectations and interest in a position, either directly or through the recruiter, at each stage of the recruitment process the first two mistakes are easily avoidable.

If you are in a situation where circumstances have changed and you are simply unable to offer the salary a candidate wants, they are going to feel shortchanged. Some options to help in this situation include:

  • Agreeing to a salary review after 6 months
  • Bringing forward participation in bonus pool to first year of employment
  • Signing bonus

Once you have got the candidate’s verbal acceptance on the offer, you really need to get the contract out to them as quickly as possible.

There are a couple of reasons for this:

  • A candidate will not resign until they have received a written contract, delaying the start date
  • Until a candidate has a written contract, the offer is just a promise and you leave the door open for other businesses to swoop in
  • Every day that passes candidates will start questioning if the offer is actually coming

Candidates can do funny things at offer if they don’t receive a contract quickly, so if you know it is going to take longer than 24 hours, you need to contact the candidate directly and explain the situation. It is one thing to hear it from a recruiter, but it is another to hear it from a hiring manager.

Once the offer is accepted, the candidate has resigned the only other tasks remaining to be done are:

  • Call the candidate, let them know you are excited that they are going to be starting with the business
  • Make sure they have a computer, logins etc. ready for day one
  • Set clear expectations for the probation period
  • Provide feedback throughout the probation period, even if it is as simple as, “I think you are doing a good job, we will catch up in more detail at the end of the month”

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

The Past, Present & Future of Mobile Recruiting

Mobile RecruitingIt’s obvious that we use our phones for everything from online shopping to driving directions, our mobile devices are there for us. It’s replaced our camera, camcorder, alarm clock and more.

The popularity and convenience of smartphones makes them a powerful tool for recruiting too. Job seekers are attached to their phones and other devices, and use them in their search for new positions.

Mobile recruiting has come a long way over the past few years, and still has room to improve and grow. Here’s a look at the evolution of mobile recruiting and where the technology is heading in the future:

The Past

  • Back in 2007, mobile recruiting was a crazy concept. Cell phones were becoming the norm, the first iPhone was released, and Twitter was rising in popularity.
  • In the beginning, mobile recruiting was all about better connecting with busy candidates. With mobile, employers could send text message alerts to let job seekers know about open positions, send emails with candidates on the go, and boost their social media efforts.
  • As more people began using smartphones, employers could use QR codes to drive job seekers to their company or career websites.
  • Some companies took advantage of the opportunity by creating job search apps. CareerBuilder released their first job search app in 2008, and others soon followed. Job seekers could now search for jobs at any time, any place from a device they almost always carried in their pockets.
  • Although job searching from mobile devices was possible, applying for jobs was another story.
  • Job seekers needed to switch to a computer to actually apply for the jobs they found on their phones or tablets. Mobile applications were either not available, not optimized for mobile, or too long and inconvenient.

The Present

  • As we’ve become more and more reliant on our smartphones and other devices, job seekers are now applying to jobs at any time from their mobile devices. In fact, a 2014 Glassdoor survey of 1,000 employees and job seekers found that 89% of those surveyed use a mobile device during their job search, and 45% use their mobile device to search for jobs at least once each day.
  • Although mobile is popular among job seekers, many employers are still trying to shift their focus to the new recruiting possibilities. In a 2014 survey conducted by CareerXroads, seven in 10 companies surveyed said they rarely used mobile to hire executives, and a similar amount said the same when hiring hourly and entry-level employees.
  • Employers who have embraced mobile recruiting are focused on two trends: mobile-optimization and mobile applications.

Optimization: Job seekers expect a mobile site that is easy to read and use from any device. This means companies are going beyond mobile-friendly and optimizing their sites for multiple mobile devices. Employers who fail to do so won’t have much luck attracting job seekers on mobile.

Mobile Applications: As mobile technology advances and becomes more popular, job seekers want to complete every stage of the process, from the search to the application, from their phones and tablets. More companies are embracing the mobile application and finding ways to make the process easier for candidates.

Some enable candidates to use their LinkedIn or other social profiles to complete sections of the application. Others are creating simplified applications that job seekers can easily complete from their devices without getting frustrated.

The Future

  • Until now, the focus of mobile recruiting has primarily been on the candidate. The future of mobile recruiting is all about creating seamless programs that make the process easier for both job seekers and employers.
  • More organizations will adopt the use of mobile on their career sites and job applications, and provide candidates the mobile experience they deserve.
  • Mobile technology will also give recruiters a simpler way to review and sort candidates, communicate with their top picks, and work with their hiring teams to choose the best person for the job.
  • Only time will tell if job seekers will be using their Apple watches to apply for jobs in the future, but mobile will continue to evolve to provide job seekers and recruiters a more convenient and effective way to complete the hiring process.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

Why Are Employers Struggling to Fill Jobs?

783af3a944ad479520b387ba941870cdMuch like Lazarus, the U.S. economy has made a spectacular comeback. Even as the skunk-like stench of the Great Recession lingers, the worst seems to be behind us (SEE FIGURE 1 BELOW)

Unemployment Rate

FIGURE 1: U.S. UNEMPLOYMENT RATE (10-YEAR)

A snapshot of the good news:

  • U.S. employers advertised the most open jobs in April 2015 than any time in the last 15 years.
  • The economy added 280,000 jobs in May 2015, beating forecasts of 225,000 jobs.
  • Job growth occurred across the board, even in retail, suggesting growing consumer demand.
  • Wages are up 2.3%, the first increase since the recession ended.

Typically, an economic recovery after a steep recession would mean that newly created jobs would fill up rapidly. There is usually pent-up demand among the unemployed and underemployed, as well as those biding their time to move up.

Why then, are so many jobs going unfilled?

  • In a U.S. Chamber of Commerce study, 53% of leaders at smaller businesses said they faced a “very or fairly major challenge in recruiting non-managerial employees.” In a survey of Inc. 5000 CEOs last year, 76% said that finding qualified people was a major problem.
  • According to a March 2014 CareerBuilder study, 50% of the companies reported unfilled positions due to a lack of qualified candidates. In the IT field, that number rose to 71%.
  • The construction industry in Wisconsin has 80,000 unfilled jobs. Just to give you a sense of how the tide has turned after the housing bust, contractors have begun showing up at competitors’ worksites to lure workers with higher pay.
  • Even the manufacturing sector is now affected by worker shortages. According to the Wall Street Journal, 75% of manufacturers surveyed were having trouble finding skilled production workers.
  • These stats are not a post-recession anomaly. In May 2011, 3 million jobs were unfilled even as millions of Americans were still out of work.

These numbers are troubling since there is a cost when jobs go unfilled. The CareerBuilder study stated that it costs companies $14,000 in revenue for every position that remains unfilled for 3 months. According to indeed.com, for the top 10 companies in the Dow Jones Index, the cost of unfilled jobs costs the U.S. $75 million in monthly GDP.

We have a lot of available labor that accumulated during the recession, and we now have jobs being created. But, these jobs and workers seem too shy to break the ice. When Clinton (Bill, not Hillary) ran for President, the slogan was “It’s the economy, stupid”. The stats above make me ask: “Is the economy stupid?”

More and more employers claim that several American workers do not have the skills to fill these newly created jobs.

So, is there really a “skills gap” at play here?

No, there is not a “skills gap.” There is, however, a training gap for employees and perception gap among employers.

First, let’s review the “perception gap.”

According to a 2014 labor survey65% of new executive assistant jobs require a bachelor’s degree, but only 19% of currently employed assistants have bachelor’s degrees. Therefore, about 81% of current executive assistants are unqualified for their own jobs, based on the degree requirement.

I have seen several excellent admins who do their jobs well and it is impossible to tell the ones with a degree from the ones without a degree. But as they often do, employers erect artificial barriers that block qualified employees from applying for jobs. Furthermore, employers often demand higher qualifications, but balk at paying based on those qualifications. So the logic goes thus: employers want someone with a college degree for a job that does not require it, but don’t want to compensate based on the degree since the job does not require it. This makes complete sense if you insane, but that may account for the gap between perceived worker availability and job vacancies.

Rather than just blaming a “skills gap,” employers would do well to hire based on a skill/experience/degree matrix rather than focus on just one aspect.

This does not, however, let job seekers off the hook.

Many workers believe that closing the gap between skills required and skills available is easy: back to school. If only life were that simple, they’d call it football.

Our education system is ill skilled to prepare workers for the workforce. According to a McKinsey study, while 72% of educational institutions believe recent graduates are ready for work, only 42% of employers agree.

I am not trying to devalue education, but the fact is that colleges were not set up to deliver job training. They were set up to teach you to think and to teach yourself. Besides, it takes a lot of review and revisions to adapt academic curricula to cater to the thousands who attend college. Often college degrees are permanent monuments to temporary knowledge.

Additionally, the jobs that exist today did not exist in the same form a decade ago – how many iPhone programmers did you know in 2005? Not many colleges can deliver the skills at short notice to find a job.

Job seekers also find it hard to pick an area to develop expertise in, especially when market demand is so unpredictable.

A few years ago, getting trained in print design was an easy ticket to a marketing job. Thanks to Mr. Jobs, those jobs were quickly replaced by interactive design. As a result, there was a shortage for graphics designers. However, it is not easy for former print designers to overnight become experts in interactive design. Besides, who knew that the design landscape would change so precipitously? There were plenty of Flash designers who were suddenly unemployed, and had to learn JavaScript, HTML5, etc. to remain viable and employable.

U.S. employers clearly have a role to play. In 2011, only 21% of workers surveyed by Accenture had received any formal training at work in the previous 5 years. Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder, surveyed more than 2,000 employers. While 80% say they were concerned about a skills gap, only 40% were doing anything about it. (SOURCE)

There are ways, however, for employers and employees to work on a training mechanism together. The following examples show a pattern:

  • As manufacturing in the U.S. rebounds, there is a shortage of welders and the average age of welders is 55. In order to increase labor supply, the American Welding Society encouraged its 70,000 members to tour high schools and explain the profession, spread the word about available high-paying jobs and even arranged for a nationwide exhibit on welding. As a result, in 2012-13, 80,000 kids completed welding courses up from 42,000 in 2009-10.
  • The state of South Carolina has worked with businesses to create apprentice programs so as to train its workforce. In 2007, only 90 companies participated and created 777 apprenticeships. In 2014, 670 companies participated to create 11,000 apprenticeships. The state has benefited from German companies like BMW and Bosch moving there, since those companies brought the German model of apprenticeships.
  • Shereef Bishay, once a lead software developer with Microsoft, has founded Dev Bootcamp, a for-profit enterprise that develops what Bishay calls “world-class beginners.” Rather than a degree, the school provides folks hands-on skills to get jobs. They learn from working professionals marketable skills like Ruby on Rails, HTML5, CSS and JavaScript.


While the labor supply and demand are out of sync after the Great Recession, writing off workers as unqualified or employers as stingy paymasters will solve nothing. “Skills Gap” is a fancy term, but the real solution is to invest in our workforce, and grow the number of market-ready employees. That way, rather than competing for a small yet qualified sliver, employers have a bigger collection of talent to pick from.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

Your Guide to Employee Assessment – Driving Team Performance

Basic CMYKEvery company has its own needs and requirements when it comes to their employees. Teams have their own chemistry with each other and individuals can react very differently in any given situation. Therefore digging deep down, getting under the skin of people is so important but can prove difficult.

Here are some of the questions you need to ask yourself prior to carrying out employee or candidate assessments to get the best from this highly valuable process.

WHAT ARE YOU LOOKING TO IMPROVE?

There are always areas to improve within a company or team, the trick is to put all your efforts into the specific area that will deliver the best results, or address the area suffering most.

Team performance – Perhaps your team isn’t integrating well with each other. This could be affecting their overall performance and morale, creating a less than efficient working environment.

Leadership – Management may be an area you are looking to improve. With better management and more focused leadership your team could be more productive. Management has the ability to offer motivation and encouragement to the entire team, improving performance.

Company growth – A lack of growth could also be holding your team back.  Identifying skills gaps, bringing in new skills, experience and talents can drive an entire business forward.

WHAT IS YOUR SITUATION?

Whether you are looking to improve team performance, identify leadership potential, reduce employee turnover or manage a period of change within your business you’ll need to react differently. Are you looking to appoint new people and want the best possible hires or just reorganizing the team and want to discover how to get the most from your people?

Perhaps your entire company is changing, merging with another or you’re introducing new goals that you’re working towards? If so, you’ll want to ensure your team embrace and align with the company’s aspirations.

The employment lifecycle consists of the following areas, which one are you at?

• Talent Identification and Engagement
• Selection and Appointment
• On-boarding and Induction
• Managing and Appraising
• Learning and Development
• Succession Planning

WHAT ARE YOU LOOKING TO MEASURE?

Team and employee assessments can measure a range of different things. The most desired information is around knowledge, skills, aptitude, attitude and potential of employees.

Information such as personality traits, working styles and working values help an employer gain an insight into potential new appointments or current employees and measure how closely aligned they are with the company’s vision, values and overall mission. If overall satisfaction is something you want to improve, this can be measured, weaknesses discovered and solutions found.

WHAT BENEFITS WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE?

The results may surprise you, but good or bad, you will have a much clearer assessment of your employees, your team and the leadership ability of your managers.  This is useful information that could help improve a number of areas.

Future recruitment strategies can be guided by the identification of skills gaps, the need for succession planning and cultural alignment. Assessments take away the ‘gut feel’ element from senior level recruitment, saving on the cost of a bad hire.

Benchmarking strong performers and understanding the behaviors and attitude that make these employees stand out can help you identify learning, development and training programs to help others.  This in turn can help in establishing you as a company with a reputation for career progression – great for employee retention and your employee brand.

For team improvements you may want to see clear ways in which you can improve employee engagement, you may even discover hidden talents within your team that can be better utilized.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

Crazy High Recruiter Fees? What You Need to Know to Make Your Investment Pay Off

recruiter-feesThe first question many employers ask right out of the gate is “How much will it cost me?” Because there seems to be a great deal of controversy and myth associated with headhunters, here is some research. The uncontested facts and figures may surprise you…

The Elephant in the Room – Recruiting Fees

  1. In general, agencies charge a fee calculated as a percentage of the annual salary and are paid based on the number of candidates placed within your company.
  2. The majority of recruiting fees run between 15% and 25% of the candidate’s total first year annual earnings. A retained search assignment can be charged up to 50% in extreme cases when it’s a senior position and the role is hard to fill. (I want to work there!) That information comes from Undercover Recruiter.
  3. In 2014 average US spend on recruitment fees was 21%, as reported by The Fordyce Letter, with trends indicating more increases to come.”
  4. Bullhorn’s North American Staffing and Recruiting Trends reported in 2013 that the average permanent placement fee paid by to a recruiting firm was $16,602 per placement.
  5. Simply stated, you should expect to be spending anywhere between 15 and 25% depending on the nature of your engagement with the recruiting firm, and the volume of hiring you will be doing with them.

Values vs. Spend

Recruiting fees are only one part of the equation. What about the value of sourcing and headhunting passive candidates who are typically the top-drawer A-player candidates that employers otherwise do not have access to? This is precisely where a skilled recruiter is worth their weight in gold.

Speaking in terms of pain based selling, many employers see huge value in alleviating the pain they’re caused by unfilled key vacancies. They simply can’t find the talent they need.

Others are relieved to have someone take on the heavy lifting that comes with recruiting, and grateful to have the hiring actually getting done.

What’s it all worth?

This chart shows the top 10 hardest to fill jobs of 2014 (according to Workopolis) along with the cost to employers when left unfilled. Bang! These numbers are pretty hard to ignore.

Untitled

(To learn more about vacancy costs visit Ere.net’s cost of vacancy formulas.)

How Much is the Cost of In-House Recruiting?

In terms of time and effort, not to mention extended vacancies and crippling bad hire decisions, the short and long term costs of keeping recruiting in-house is precisely why so many employers today are hiring recruiters who can and will get the job done, on time and in most cases cost-effectively.

The average in-house recruitment cost of filling a vacancy, using internal or external recruitment methods is reported by Monster.com to be around $9,000 CDN.

Compare that to the fees vs. vacancy costs listed above for the critical hard to fill vacancies. It’s not hard to see why more and more employers are seeing the value of using external resources who are trained and highly experienced at sourcing critical, hard to find skilled candidates.

The Takeaways

The important thing to remember about recruiters is that they aren’t all created equal. Some recruiters and executive search firms use more effective tools and resources to source right fit passive candidates than others.

Good recruiters invest far more time into tracking and building long term ‘know-like-trust’ relationships with passive A-Level talent.

Always be up front with your recruiter about what you need, and don’t be afraid to ask questions. It’s your business to know about the search methods, tools and techniques your headhunter will be using on your behalf.

At the end of the day, isn’t having talented staff worth it?

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

Your Average Time to Hire – How Do You Measure Up?

Average Time to HireAfter a recent survey published by the Dice-DFH Vacancy Duration Measure revealed that on average it took 26.8 working days to fill jobs in February – up almost by a day compared to January, RecruitmentBuzz launched their own investigation into their reader’s average length of time taken to hire. So, they included it in their latest poll question – ‘What is your average time to hire?’

Unsurprisingly, only 10% of recruiters reported that on average, it took over 12 weeks between sourcing a candidate to actual point of hire. Unsurprisingly because as the war on talent and skills shortages continues to swell, it is very much doubted that hiring managers and businesses would keep candidates on a 3-month string!

So what about the other end of the spectrum? 27% of respondents agreed with the Dice report and revealed that it took only up to 4 weeks to hire a candidate. While this is great news for a candidate that may be desperate for a job, it is up for debate if the company that’s hiring has a very efficient and competent process or if they are hoping to fill a role as quickly as possible and not giving much thought to the skills behind the candidate until it’s potentially too late.

A further 27% of companies take a little longer, averaging an 8-12 week hiring process but the majority of recruiters (36%) agreed that 4-8 weeks is the usual time taken for a new hire to be made.

As a recruiter, it’s so important to understand the metrics behind your time to hire and look to improve it as qualified candidates continue to be in scarce supply. Look to adopt new technologies that can both speed up the process but also save money – techniques such as video interviewing. You should also strive to create the perfect job description and maintain regular contact with the candidates that you stamp with your employer brand.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

5 Ways To Make Sure You Know Exactly Who You’re Hiring

UntitledAs the ousted former CEO of Yahoo!, the disgraced Dean at MIT, the publically shamed past President of IBM or the would-be head football coach at Notre Dame can tell you, lying on your resume never really pays off in the long run.

That these extremely public, extremely prestigious posts were each obtained by candidates later found to be lying on their resumes suggest, it’s a problem that’s a pervasive and increasingly prevalent problem for employers everywhere.

Even though background and reference checks have emerged as more or less an inevitable component of almost every employer’s pre-screening process, a surprising percentage of candidates are willing to risk getting caught in exchange for the rewards of getting an offer.

According to a recent Harris Poll survey on behalf of CareerBuilder, in fact, fully 58% of hiring managers reported to having previously discovering a candidate misrepresenting, hyperbolizing or downright lying on their resumes during the hiring process.

This epidemic seems endemic across functions, with financial services (73%) hospitality (71%), tech (63%) and healthcare (63%) ranking among the industries most likely to have encountered someone lying on their resume. The recruiters responding to the survey indicated the most common resume lies included embellishing skill set (57%), embellishing previous responsibilities (55%) and falsifying dates of prior employment (42%).

While these white lies are most common recruiting red flags most often raised by candidates lying on their resumes, some go so far as to throw some blatantly fake – but kind of funny – fabrications into the mix. Take the guy who claimed his prior experience was serving as the Prime Minister for a completely fictional country. Or the candidate who felt lucky that no one would Google him to find out that he was not in fact, an Olympic Gold medalist in rollerblading (which, coincidentally, is also not really an Olympic sport).

Even these tall tales can’t stretch the truth that background screening service EmployeeScreenIQ found in a recent survey that an overwhelming majority of employers are more likely to hire a candidate whose background check reveals a criminal record than one whose background check raises resume red flags. In fact, 55% of recruiters responding to the survey said they’d still consider a candidate with a prior conviction, compared with only 10% who report they’d give the similar benefit of the doubt to someone who they discovered had intentionally lied on their resume.

This offense, it seems, is the one crime that’s simply unforgivable, at least as far as recruiters and employers are concerned.

Of course, these numbers don’t speak to the candidates who successfully slip through the screening safeguards in place during the pre-employment process designed to preempt these practices; in fact, NBC News recently estimated that over 250,000 professionals are found out and fired for resume lies by their current employers well after onboarding.

The high costs of a bad hire can be steep, with the price tag for backfilling a bad hire estimated to cost employers an average of $50,000 for exempt workers, according to recent BLS data.

No recruiter can risk paying the heavy price tag associated with failing to find out a resume-related fabrication or falsehood before it’s too late; while lying, cheating and stretching the truth might be pretty much inescapable parts of pretty much every recruiting process, getting burned by resume lies shouldn’t have to be.

Here are 5 things every good recruiter should do make sure they know exactly who they’re hiring:

1. Go Beyond the Background Check.

Sure, chances are good you’re already running at least a basic background check, which still serve as valuable tools for researching candidates’ criminal records, credit histories or previous employment history. There are, however, many things that the majority of background checks fail to flag, such as inflated claims of their current salary, true skill set or personality alignment with company culture.

This is why it’s essential to utilize other reliable pre-employment screening tools and techniques in combination with basic background checks.

Leveraging proven pre-screen methodologies like mandatory skills testing or even basic behavioral or personality assessments can offer a much more balanced and clear representation of who a candidate really is and whether or not they’re able to deliver as promised than a simple background check and basic reference process.

Even though the most rudimentary background check will likely uncover a relatively minor arrest from 20 years ago on a prospective new hire’s record, using this tool in tandem with another testing methodology can be critical in offering employers the information and insights they need to determine whether or not a respective red flag might be worth overlooking or if they’re indicative of bigger issues that might make them unemployable. After all, when you’re judging the content of someone’s character, context counts.

2. Ask References The Right Questions.

Yeah, reference checking can be a major pain in the process ass – sure, anyone can come up with a few names and numbers of people willing to put in a good word, whether or not they actually deserve it. Likewise, any employer can contact a listed reference, ask a few asinine and practically pointless (but polite) questions and do nothing more than that requisite box before extending an offer.

But doing more than just finding out if a candidate didn’t totally suck to work with or whether or not their resume accurately reflects the responsibilities listed for a previous role can offer employers a broader picture of a potential hire, and a much more accurate predictor of whether or not a candidate will deliver as promised and that their experience or expertise actually align with your open position.

Rather than ask a few standard yes/no or close-ended questions, consider leaving some room for references to speak freely and openly about their previous experience with a potential hire – it’s imperative to let them guide the conversation and listen closely enough to follow up appropriately with enough questions to make sure that you understand not only if a candidate meets the requirements of your open position, but also the intangibles no job description or resume could capture, like culture fit or career aspirations.

These soft skills are every bit as imperative when determining whether or not it’s worth moving ahead with making an offer, and reference checking represents an ideal opportunity to do the due diligence worth doing to make the right decision and preempt bad hires before they happen.

3. Stop Going Through the Motions.

People who lie on their resumes or during the interviewing process generally know that they’re taking a risk by misrepresenting themselves to a potential employer, and as a result, are likely well prepared with their own scripted responses for the most commonplace and cliché questions (like “what is your greatest strength?” or “why do you think you’d be a good fit for the position?”); instead requiring specific examples from their previous work experiences (“tell me about a time when…”) or similar behavioral based questions that answer not just how to answer a question about how to do a job.

Every good recruiter knows there’s a huge difference – and that asking pointed questions is a far better way to poke holes in past experiences or perceived expertise than simply sticking to the same old script that everyone expects when going through the interview process.

Of course, for this to work, you’ve got to know more about the job than just what’s on the description – recruiters aren’t the only ones who can convincingly sting together keywords and fake their way through a role they don’t really understand.

The base assumption that recruiters don’t really know the roles they’re recruiting for is one of the primary reasons so many candidates risk resume lies – because you don’t know what you don’t know, you know.

4. Trust, But Verify.

The easiest way to preempt making a bad hire is by requiring candidates to perform a small task or simple project as part of the recruiting process; many companies make this a mandatory step for every job seeker. Many expect even the best candidates to be willing to do this sort of extra work for free as a means of proving not only their skills, but also their motivation and whether or not they really want the job.

This is, in theory, a good idea, but make sure that if you require candidates to do extra work and do not plan on providing any sort of additional compensation for adding this additional step (and often, a ton of time) to the hiring process, make sure that you’ll not only gain insight into the employee’s work, but that they’ll have a chance to preview the kinds of assignments and projects the successful candidate can expect on the job.

Be aware that the more involved or intense these assignments are, however, the more likely candidates will be to drop out or decline to move ahead in the process, so it’s always a good idea to make sure to compensate candidates for work related tasks or projects at comparable to what you’d pay any other freelancer.

That way, not only are you able to get real examples of real work from real candidates, but by really paying them for the extra sweat equity, you’re going to see whether or not a candidate’s resume is really representative of their expertise or experience – and know that you’re going to get what you pay for before actually making an offer.

5. Never Stop Recruiting.

The easiest way to know who you’re hiring, of course, is to know who you’re hiring – this is why employee referrals are such an effective source of hire, and why it’s imperative for every recruiter to focus less on filling reqs and more on developing lasting relationships, driving referrals and building a pipeline of prospects, instead.

When you know a potential hire before ever seeing their resume, chances are you’ll know what they’re about – and know that when the time comes to convert connections into candidates, you know what you’re getting when you successfully transform passive prospects into actual active applicants.

If you don’t know exactly who you’re hiring, chances are you’re not hiring the right person in the first place – no matter what their resume says.

And that’s one mistake that no recruiter or employer can afford to make. No lie.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

Employee Benefits – What You Should and Shouldn’t Offer

Employee BenefitsWhether you’re a small business owner or running a multinational, one key question to consider is what, if any, employee benefits you are going to offer. Potential staff will be on the lookout for strong benefits packages, which can act as a valuable incentive to attract the best talent. On the other hand, they can be costly to provide and may prove to be more effort for the company than they are really worth. If you’re thinking of offering benefits, the following are some factors to consider.

Are They Really Necessary?

Although offering benefits isn’t strictly necessary for the running of your business, it is nevertheless advisable. It may not be immediately beneficial cost-wise, but you should reap the rewards in the longer run. Appropriate benefits will not only attract the top talent, but will boost overall company morale. You will have team members who will produce better work and will want to stay with the business for longer.

By the time a new hire starts, they will have been through one or more interviews and may have been subject to psychometric assessments and even group exercises. Having worked hard to prove that they were the right candidate, they will feel entitled to something in return. It is important to remember that your work force is your greatest asset, so keeping them happy is key. If they feel that they may be at a disadvantage in comparison with peers in other firms or that they could get a better deal elsewhere, they will leave and the business will suffer as a result.

What Kind of Benefits Should I Offer?

In deciding upon what to offer, think of the age range and demographic of the majority of your employees. Individuals in their 20s and early 30s are more likely to be drawn in by company getaways, bonuses for performance and company cars. An older demographic might be more interested in private health insurance, disability insurance and pension plans. Offering training is always a good idea. It allows individuals to continue learning and demonstrates your commitment to their personal growth. In return, you benefit from more qualified and capable employees.

Where Should I Draw The Line?

It is important to remember that you should never commit to something that could be detrimental to the company. The first and perhaps most obvious rule is not to commit to benefits that you cannot genuinely afford. If you’re a startup, you are unlikely to be in a position to lavish expensive tangible benefits on your team. Happily, however, they will understand that the real rewards will be reaped at a later stage as the business grows. Many startups offer stock option schemes, which garner engagement and commitment based upon future performance. Some, however, overly dilute the business’ equity and pay the price at a later stage so it is important to balance your offer in line with candidate perceptions and market norms.

One final, yet surprisingly common mistake is to offer unwanted benefits. Once again, consider carefully the demographic of your workforce and use market intelligence or perhaps create an anonymous survey in order to gauge their views and align benefits packages accordingly.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…