Category Archives: Interviewing

5 Ways to Get Your Candidate Experience Right

5 WaysThe acquisition and development of new skills is a key priority for most organizations. The effective recruitment of new employees and retention of existing talent in a labor market in which unemployment is falling, opportunities are increasing and salaries are starting to rise, provides challenges for all recruiters and HR teams.

For the public sector this challenge is intensified. The most sought after skills are needed by organizations in all sectors and at all levels, meaning that the public sector is competing with others for the same talent, and also fighting to keep the people it has from being tempted elsewhere.

The way that job seekers approach the market is also changing. More searching is done on mobile devices and at all times, not just core office hours. These searches aren’t just restricted to open vacancies but now include finding out what type of employer the hiring company is. There are sites where job seekers can rate their interview experience, sharing some of the questions asked, and also offer views on their employer. Rejected applicants can write about their experiences too. Social media platforms increase the range of channels through which hiring organizations can share the messages showing what type of business they are to work for.

In a competitive recruitment market, where skills are in demand and options available across sectors, first impressions count. The way that organizations go about attracting and recruiting new employees sets an expectation for the eventual employment experience. It can also be a differentiator for candidates with multiple options. Rejected candidates are now also part of the recruitment ecosystem. They are a source of referrals and whilst their background may have ruled them out at present, they could become relevant in the future, so the way we treat them is important. The candidate experience isn’t just about the people we hire but also the ones we reject, whether it’s at application stage or later in the process.

The benefits of a giving a good candidate experience definitely repay the investment in making it happen. It’s a differentiator for those who are in demand and creates advocates of those who aren’t an exact match. The private sector treats job applicants as consumers, knowing that those they reject still purchase their goods and services, so the public sector needs to treat them similarly or risk losing out on the talent it needs.

For public sector employers competing with private sector organizations for key staff, a positive candidate experience can create a real advantage. Here are five ways to make sure you get it right from the start…

Road test your recruitment process
Do you know what it’s like to be an applicant for one of your roles? Find out by applying. The key things here are ease of use and speed of communication. Most candidates are time pressed and want to give just the information necessary at the application stage. They need a quick acknowledgement and some idea of the length and make up of the process. If applications won’t be processed until a certain date make sure they know, and also communicate if they haven’t been successful. And above all else, remember that at least half will be applying from a mobile device, probably during a commute or another time when they may have patchy connectivity, so the process needs to be mobile friendly and concise. Ask them lots of questions, and they’ll probably drop the application.

Well-written job postings
Most job seekers, particularly those with sought after skills, want to know what’s in it for them. They don’t apply to a checklist of competencies and achievements but to an opportunity to be a part of an organization’s vision and values, in a role that will give them new experiences and challenges. Make it a job proposition and use the job posting to paint a picture, portray the scope of the role, how it fits in and what difference it will make. Make it realistic too – successful candidates who find the role not matching expectations may not stay around too long. A well-written advert should also cut down on the number of applicants, by attracting those who are most relevant.

Interview experience
In a competitive market the chances are that some organizations will reduce the number of interviews to get their person quickly meaning sought after candidates are unlikely to be available for three or four rounds of interviews. Hiring managers need to be aware of this and should be investing the same amount of time in preparation as the candidates. Do you know how the hiring manager interviews? Or how they sell the opportunity? Check by having them interview someone in HR or the recruitment team, or sit in on one of their interviews. Job applicants now rate their interviews online so stories of cancelled appointment slots, late starts or ill-prepared interviewers can put many off from applying. The time invested in finding the right person can be very indicative of decision making in the wider business.

Keep them informed
Candidates always want to know where they are in the process and have feedback on how they are performing. They may well be pursuing a few opportunities and will look positively on those that keep them informed, acknowledge correspondence, advise them on the length of the process and always give information on the next steps. Lack of communication, and feedback, is usually the number one reason why candidates think they have had a poor experience so everyone involved in the recruitment process needs to be comfortable communicating. Hiring managers in particular need to understand the importance of timely, constructive feedback and be prepared to offer it.

On-boarding
The process of on-boarding should start when the candidate applies for the role. It may be an email, or application through a third party site, but one of the applications received will be the hiring company’s next employee and possibly one that will be bringing some much needed new skills and experience into the organization. Problems in a new role usually occur within the first few months, and will almost certainly be down to an expectation mismatch regarding either the position or company culture. The best on-boarding processes offer a personal, high touch approach involving the hiring manager and any other employees involved in the recruitment process.

Simplicity, speed, transparency and communication are all crucial to a positive candidate experience that engages and attracts the best candidates.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with only qualified and verified professionals that we have vetted for each position you are looking to fill.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

Apple’s Interview Questions Revealed

Apple's Interview QuestionsWhat does it take to get a job at Apple? It might be a dream job for many but aside from the talent and experience required for the role, a candidate needs to keep a cool head in one of the highest-pressure interviews they’re likely to have.

Business Insider have gone through a number of questions, submitted to Glassdoor, that applicants have been asked at interviews at Apple. Some were practical, others technical, but there’s also a fair few esoteric ones in there too.

A sample of the questions can be seen below, alongside the roles they were related to:

“If you have 2 eggs, and you want to figure out what’s the highest floor from which you can drop the egg without breaking it, how would you do it? What’s the optimal solution?” — Software Engineer candidate

“Explain to an 8 year old what a modem/router is and its functions.” — At-Home Advisor candidate

“How many children are born every day?” — Global Supply Manager candidate

“There are three boxes, one contains only apples, one contains only oranges, and one contains both apples and oranges. The boxes have been incorrectly labeled such that no label identifies the actual contents of the box it labels. Opening just one box, and without looking in the box, you take out one piece of fruit. By looking at the fruit, how can you immediately label all of the boxes correctly?” — Software QA Engineer candidate

“How would you breakdown the cost of this pen?” — Global Supply Manager candidate

“Are you smart?” — Build Engineer candidate

“You put a glass of water on a record turntable and begin slowly increasing the speed. What happens first — does the glass slide off, tip over, or does the water splash out?” — Mechanical Engineer candidate

“Are you creative? What’s something creative that you can think of?” — Software Engineer candidate

“You seem pretty positive, what types of things bring you down?” — Family Room Specialist candidate

“If you’re given a jar with a mix of fair and unfair coins, and you pull one out and flip it 3 times, and get the specific sequence heads heads tails, what are the chances that you pulled out a fair or an unfair coin?” — Lead Analyst candidate

“What was your best day in the last 4 years? What was your worst?” —Engineering Project Manager candidate

“How would you test a toaster?” — Software QA Engineer candidate

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with only qualified and verified professionals that we have vetted for each position you are looking to fill.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

Employer Branding – Is Candidate Resentment Affecting Your Profits?

Employer BrandingWhen it comes to recruitment, above anything else, aligning candidates to your business’ values and culture is so important. This requires assessing someone’s own values, beliefs and behaviors against your own values and culture to evaluate what constitutes as a good ‘fit’ in a candidate.

In Mark Murphey’s Hire for Attitude reports he states that of the 20,000 new hires 46% of them failed within 18 months and of these, 89% left because their attitudes did not align to that of the company. Only 11% failed because of a lack of skills.

It is clear from this report, and so many of our own case studies, that finding a candidate with the same values and vision as your company is so much more important than simply acquiring the right skills. Skills can be taught, behavior can’t.

So how do you find these candidates that are so aligned to your own values?

First, you must define your culture, your values and your beliefs. This sounds obvious, but so many companies we see struggle to put into words what they are all about. And if you can’t put it into words, then how will your candidates know if you are the right fit for them?

Never forget that the recruitment process should work both ways.

While candidates are working hard to impress you, you need to be working just as hard to engage and excite them. Now that you’ve defined your values, you need to live them and help candidates understand who you are. There are two key areas to work on to do this: the overall recruitment process and the interview situation. Refining these things leads to improving the candidate experience.

It can be good…

Whether candidates are appointed or not, maintaining a positive reputation can put you in a good light in the talent industry and ensure you have a pool of talent available for future hiring campaigns. CareerBuilder reported that 56% of candidates who felt they had a positive hiring process experience said they would seek employment with the company again in the future, 37% would tell others to apply there, and 23% would be more likely to purchase products or services from that company. So candidate experience not only affects your hiring, but your business as a whole.

Or it can be very bad

On the other end of the scale, a poor candidate experience can be extremely detrimental to your brand. Global brand PepsiCo have measured the impact candidate resentment can have. Their model estimates that if 100 applicants apply for one role and PepsiCo hires 5,000 people annually, then each year 495,000 candidates will be rejected. If each one of the candidates had a negative experience, and most likely told 1 friend, then that makes 990,000 people with a negative view of PepsiCo. Assuming that around 8% of people who know of the poor experience would stop purchasing the brand’s products and an average customer is worth $20 per year to PepsiCo, then each year of poor candidate experience is responsible for $1,584,000 loss of revenue.

Let that number sink in for a moment. The negative candidate experience is most likely the cause of a lack of communication and positive experience. So in reality this loss of over $1 million is as a result of no effort at all.

In fact, as high as this number is, Russell Beck, an expert in Talent Management, innovation and recruitment thought leadership, presents his theory that the revenue loss should be much higher, meaning poor employee branding and a bad candidate experience could be costing businesses millions every single year.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

4 Ways HR Can Help to Hire and Retain Employees in 2016

Hire and Retain Employees in 2016HR teams are being asked to do their jobs in a very different organizational environment and do them more quickly than ever before.

The world’s biggest firms are bigger than they’ve ever been, and run by more decentralized decision-making.

Their employees work in more countries than before, often do jobs that are more specialized, must collaborate with each other more than they did five years ago to complete the same task (launch an updated version of a product, say), and – given they work in more dispersed, less centralized and hierarchical structures – must compete harder for promotion opportunities too.

A harder job for HR

This makes life hard for heads of HR and their teams who must attract, engage, and retain employees asked to take-on more decision-making responsibility in a more dispersed organizational structure, develop a wider range of skills, and work with a large array of people that they often don’t know or share a common culture with, and with whom they have no formal reporting or management relationship.

It must feel a bit like asking a sheep dog to start herding monkeys; once, each group of employees was fairly homogeneous and would respond in predictable ways, now senior managers want employees to be more independent, more interdependent, and still all adhere to a common plan.

And, while HR teams have a harder job, they are also under pressure to do it more quickly.

Working with and talking to thousands of functional executives this year, CEB staff have heard some version of the same refrain again and again: “It seems more difficult to get stuff done; we just feel really slow.” The size and complexity of firms, and the need for managers to collaborate with so many people, has slowed the making of important decisions just when it needs to speed up.

A fast decision isn’t a worse decision

Often, managers think that if they want to speed up decision-making, they must also be prepared to make worse decisions.

For example, a recruiting decision could be made more quickly but without getting as much internal input or spending as much time ensuring the candidate “fits” with the organization. They think they must trade off making a fast decision to ensure they make the right decision.

But, as much as our work this year has shown that executives worry about how long it takes to make an important decision at their firm, the work has also shown that “fast” for “right” is a false trade-off.

HR teams feel this fast/right conundrum in many parts of their work, but there are eight in particular they can speed-up decisions without getting them wrong. Four will be covered in this post and four in the next post in the series.

4 ways HR can speed up decisions

1. Compete for talent more intelligently — Organizations increasingly need highly specialized roles and skills regardless of the industry they operate in. But many HR teams lack the right data, or the right ability to use it, to find such people and hire them.

They must first take the time to understand and anticipate what types of skills they will need in the future; this will pay dividends later. They must also understand how to use talent analytics cost-effectively to find the people best placed to fill these roles.

And, finally, they should concentrate on non-traditional labor markets they may have overlooked (in an adjacent industry, say).

2. Streamline the recruiting process — The average time it takes for a recruiting team to fill a position has risen substantially in the past five years. Most human resource functions have a big opportunity to speed up hiring without compromising quality.

More complex hiring requirements have complicated recruiter workloads, recruiting processes, and hiring decisions. As a result, the average time to fill an open position is at 63 business days – 21 more days than it was five years ago.

This can mean less savvy firms lose talent to competitors and waste an average of $8.5 million per 1,000 vacancies in lost productivity and additional recruiting work.

Many companies try to combat this by giving recruiters more: more resources, more policies, more tools, and more information. But it rarely works. Instead they should look to streamline the recruiting process itself. Recruiting teams should take three steps:

  • Realign resources for recruitment to focus on speeding-up hiring for current and future posts.
  • Identify and remove hidden process inefficiencies that slow down hiring.
  • Slim down the amount of information and stakeholders that influence hiring decisions, and learn how to manage it better.

3. Don’t ask employees to “own” their careers, partner with them instead — Two-thirds of companies will face an internal skills shortage in the next three to five years, and only 30% of employees are satisfied with the future career opportunities at their organizations. This makes it imperative that HR teams engage and retain the right people to staff the roles the company needs in the future.

To do this, 90% of heads of HR say they want to move away from a promotion-based career culture to a “growth-based” one where employees move laterally to acquire new skills that then puts them in a position to take on a better paid, more responsible role.

Most organizations try to do this by encouraging employees to “own” their careers, and providing sample career paths, access to job boards, and career conversations. But this can often mean that employees don’t develop the skills the firm needs, which produces an internal skills shortage and/or the firm losing employees it wanted to keep.

Instead firms should encourage “career partnerships” that are of value to both the company and employees. Employees should be shown how the skills the firm wants them to develop will make them more employable.

The HR team should market the right position (full-time or project-based) to the right employees rather than using passive channels like internal job-boards, and then make it easy for employees to shift between teams. This keeps employees engaged and provides managers with the right skills at the right time.

4. Don’t base your rewards on competitors’ offers; do focus on meeting employee needs — As organizations compete to hire the same people to take on these increasingly specialist and independent roles, senior managers are understandably looking at ways to control the cost of hiring and retaining good staff.

Almost 80% of firms base how they reward employees from competitors, but that approach is costly and inefficient. For the average 10,000-employee organization to move from the 45th to the 50th percentile of market for total compensation, it would cost $58 million and would yield negligible improvements in voluntary staff retention.

Rewards that instead focus on meeting employee needs can improve intent to stay and performance by double digits because they are far more relevant to employees’ work and lives. This includes things like, financial needs (obviously) but also the need for acknowledgement for a job well done, emotional needs, and family needs (flexible working etc).

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

5 Employer Pain Points That Video Interviewing Addresses

Video InterviewingRecruiters, HR Professionals and Hiring Managers are all involved in the hiring process but not all share the pains of the other. Each faces challenges in their position the other does not fully understand or appreciate. Video interviewing offers a one size fits all solution to handle the difficulties faced by those in the hiring profession.

Pain Point #1: Scheduling Hassles – HR Professionals and recruiters both feel this pain. Scheduling and rescheduling phone interviews with candidates can take as long as the actual phone interview. Taking just minutes to set up, automated virtual interviews allow the candidate to interview on their schedule no matter what time of day or night. HR professionals/recruiters are free to focus on other responsibilities as a result.

Pain Point #2: Discrimination – Everyone involved in the hiring process wants to ensure their company’s hiring standards are fair and diverse but the HR professional has the greatest concern of all for this. Video interviewing is seen by some in this role as a tool that further facilitates bias however automated interviewing’s use of a structured interview process where all candidates answer the same questions, ensures no prejudiced questions creep in. Video interviewing is also able to screen candidates back into the process who might have unfairly been dismissed solely on the basis of their resume. Through a recorded video interview, minorities are able to dismiss pre-conceived biases surrounding their race, gender, age and so on. Additionally, recorded video interviews provide a great record of an organization’s non-discriminatory hiring practices.

Pain Point #3: Too many candidates, so little time – Organizations receive around 120 resumes for every open job position which leaves recruiters and hiring managers little time to screen them all. In fact, according to the Ladders.com, recruiters spend an average of only 6 seconds reviewing each resume. Even when whittled down to a manageable number, recruiting professionals might still need to conduct a dozen phone interviews and from that the hiring manager may select up to five candidates with whom he/she will spend hours interviewing. Video interviewing decreases time wasted on numerous phone screens and unnecessary face to face interviews.

Pain Point #4: Inadequate collaboration – Panel interviews are conducted so hiring managers may collaborate on their interest in a candidate because collaboration can’t adequately be achieved with phone screen notes. In-person however, the panel’s time is greatly burdened, especially if they determine in five minutes that the candidate is not a fit but are forced for etiquette’s sake to continue with the interview. Some video interviewing vendors allow you to compare candidates’ video responses side by side so that a more accurate picture develops and the hiring managers can save time by targeting candidates who best fit their organization.

Pain Point #5: Shallow candidate pool – Despite the increased number of resumes per position, hiring managers continue to complain that they can’t find adequate talent. Video interviewing allows managers and recruiters to interview job candidates outside their geographic region and for less expense than phone screening. This not only expands the candidate pool but reduces travel costs associated with flying in candidates.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

Why Google’s Hiring Practices Are Ahead of the Curve

Google's Hiring ProcessGoogle is a name synonymous with innovation. From its search engine and advertising to its phones and online apps, the brand is one that seems to be forever forward-thinking, and this is apparent in its hiring strategies as well. Google candidates come from far and wide to try to become a part of the company, but many don’t know what they are getting themselves in for when it comes time to interview. What makes Google’s hiring practices so innovative?

Famous Interview Questions

For starters, the questions themselves are often unexpected and seemingly off the wall, but they serve a purpose. Famous examples include, “Why is a manhole cover round?” and “How many piano tuners are there in the entire world?” Now, these seem nonsensical, but what they do is show how a candidate thinks. Although Google is getting away from asking these types of questions, they allow the interviewer to see the candidate walk through a problem. Even if there is no right answer or if there are multiple right answers, the idea is to see the candidate in action.

People Are Paid Based on Talent

Many companies will try to distribute pay fairly evenly across specific departments or for similar titles. Google, on the other hand, bases pay on talent more than anything. So, if you are a programmer and your coworker is a programmer and both of you were hired on the same day, you might expect to make about the same thing. Working at Google, you and your coworker would be judged on your talents and what they bring to the company. Suppose your coworker was able to solve a difficult code issue that no one else in the department could do. In Google’s eyes, he’s more talented, and therefore more valuable.

Management Butts Out

Another problem that many employers and employees face is the role of management. Many managers forget what it was like to be an employee very quickly after being promoted, and this can lead to them sticking their noses into everything, slowing down productivity. At Google, the thinking is that people were hired to do their jobs based on their ability, and therefore, management should be involved as little as possible. If management is hiring the right people, there should be no need to micromanage.

Get the Team Involved

Google also uses committees to decide on candidates instead of allowing individuals to take care of things. The reason for this is that a single person may be having a really bad day or a really good day during the interview or when making the final decision. This can cause changes in perception of the candidate that may not be fair. By utilizing a group of people to make the decision, this eliminates potential bias. It also allows people who work at Google the chance to decide whether the candidate is someone they want to work with on a daily basis. Being stuck working with someone you don’t like is no fun!

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

How Can You Use the ‘Golden Hello’ to Help Attract Talent?

Signing BonusThe “golden hello” — more commonly known as a “signing bonus” — is back. Research from WorldatWork found that sign on bonuses were at an all-time high last year: 74% of employers were offering them, versus just 54% of employers back in 2010.

Not only are more organizations offering signing bonuses to new hires, but the bonuses are also being paid at higher rates. Executives have benefited most from this generosity, with 41% of them now receiving more than $50,000 in signing bonuses.

It’s not really surprising to see the rise of the signing bonus, as highly discerning employers are running out of ideas to attract top talent in a highly competitive market. The golden hello seems to offer a quick fix to the problem.

But, before we all start open our corporate purses and foisting thousands of dollars on hard-to-find candidates, it’s worth considering whether or not signing bonuses really do attract high-quality talent.

Little Direct Evidence Suggests That Signing Bonuses Will Actually Attract More Applicants

However, we could make a roundabout argument in support of the signing bonus. Several studies have shown that applicants are more likely to reply to job advertisement that clearly present pay. One would imagine that if a signing bonus was clearly presented in the job advertisement, that would make the role more financially attractive, thus drawing in more applicants.

However, this is a risky approach. A publicized signing bonus could make your business sound desperate, damaging your employer brand. It could also create resentment in existing employees who hadn’t received signing bonuses when they joined the company. Highly public signing bonuses might also encourage mercenary candidates to apply — you know, those candidates who care way more about the bonus than they do about your business.

If you are going to use signing bonuses as a talent acquisition technique, it might make sense to communicate these bonuses on a need-to-know basis.

Signing Bonuses May Help in the Negotiating Room

Using signing bonuses to attract talent may not be a great strategy. But that doesn’t mean signing bonuses are useless. In fact, the golden hello can be very useful at the negotiating table.

Signing bonuses can be used to offset any specific losses that a candidate may incur as a result of changing jobs, such as a reduced salary, a loss of benefits, or an increased commuting time. By easing the pain of these losses, signing bonuses can give hesitant talent the impetus to make the jump.

It seems clear that there are some real advantages to using a signing bonus in these talent-scarce times — but it should be used judiciously. Don’t go flaunting your signing bonuses in an attempt to woo talent. Instead, introduce the signing bonus quietly at the negotiation stage as a way to coax high-quality candidates over to your corner.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

Recruiting for Employee Engagement

Employee EngagementEmployee engagement is a topic that comes up regularly and many companies conduct surveys in an attempt to measure employ engagement.

Unfortunately, it is reported to be low. Per Gallup, the majority of U.S. employees are not engaged despite… They measured employee engagement at 31.5%. Supposedly, this is the highest it has been since 2000.  Per “The Employee Engagement Mindset” by Timothy Clark, only 25% of employees are highly engaged.

We know that highly engaged employees have more productivity, lower turnover, more innovation, etc., and so many companies survey internally to measure their employee engagement and take steps to improve it. Yet, it has not been enough to increase the numbers within our companies.

Part of the problem may be that we are not hiring employees within our organizations prone to engagement or who understand employee engagement.

Huh?  What do you mean? (you may ask.)

“The Employee Engagement Mindset” said it best…the primary responsibility for employee engagement lies with the employee. Secondary responsibility is with the company.  Basically, you could give an employee everything and they still might be disengaged or at least not highly engaged (just moderately engaged).  Fundamentally, employee engagement starts with the employee.

Many employees are waiting for their companies to engage them, waiting for their managers to provide feedback, waiting for to be recognized to do something new in their jobs, etc. These employees do not know that employee engagement starts with themselves.

So, how do we identify potential employees who are tend to be engaged?

A recruiter might ask applicants the following questions:

What is your view or understanding of employee engagement?

Do you want to be a highly engaged employee? Yes / No

What does being a highly engaged employee mean to you and how does it happen?

Where does the primary responsibility lie for employee engagement?

A. With executives

B. With managers

C. With the employee

I see from your resume that you have been doing X for a long time. Why do you do X?  Why do you get up every day and continue to do X?

Not only do highly engaged employees typically care about what they do, but you also might want to delve into the applicant’s background to see if you can identify some or all of the six drivers of high engagement (per Timothy Clark):

  • Connect – Have they had many great relationships and/or deeper connections with others at the companies they have worked for?
  • Shape – Have they shaped their jobs and customized them a bit in the past to fit their own interests and passions?
  • Learn – Are they always learning and gaining new skills?
  • Stretch – Have they left their comfort zone to push the limits in their skills?
  • Achieve – Do they have achievements that they are proud of?
  • Contribute – Have they impacted other people’s lives and given of themselves to help others?

The more of these drivers you can identify, the more prone the candidate is for high employee engagement. Typically highly engaged employees will usually know it starts with them. But some employees are just not aware where employee engagement starts and they need to be coached.

Many people simply exist in organizations, but we should be looking to hire the people who have engaged in the past. Those are the people we need to recruit in order to raise our own employee engagement. Perhaps their current companies are messing up and not taking on the secondary responsibility of employee engagement, because it does take the company’s efforts as well.

With no support from their current employer, people prone to high employee engagement will leave that employer for a company that understands the company has to work towards employee engagement as well.

As recruiters, we should watch out for the applicants who in their pasts seem to have been chronically disengaged and who don’t seem to care about it (or what they do) and are pretty much un-coachable in taking an active role in their employee engagement. Hiring those applicants will only lower our companies’ employee engagement and nothing a company does will make them highly engaged (they just are not prone to high employee engagement and don’t realize it starts with themselves).

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

Could Job Hoppers Actually Be Good for a Company?

Job HoppersAccording to CNN Money, last year over 2.8 million employees quit their job in search of better salaries. While that is often a great signal of the impending wage hikes and a strengthening economy, this can feel like a sudden brain drain for companies. The healthy economy has drawn many employees out of their comfy positions and into the job market. HR departments are left trying to figure out how to increase employee retention rates and hiring managers are left wondering if job hoppers are suitable candidates for open positions. The answer is job hoppers can be excellent employees for a variety of reasons.

Job Hoppers Bring a Wealth of Experience

Many job hoppers gain more experience in various companies than they ever did at one company alone. In every position, they learn something new. Many times, companies are in dire need of change but they don’t know it. In many organizations with long-term employees, a noticeable trend starts to emerge. People start saying things like “we’ve always done it this way”. Innovation starts to feel like a dirty word. It’s only when new blood comes in that this viewpoint gets shaken up. Job hoppers are excellent agents for change in these kinds of companies because they’ve experienced a variety of different ways of doing things.

Job Hoppers Are Team Players

It seems counter intuitive to suggest someone who puts their career first is a team player, but think about how a job hopper survives; they hop from position to position, ingratiating themselves into new teams with different personalities. In order to survive, a job hopper needs to be the consummate team player. This can come in handy at an organization seeking to establish a sense of team spirit and cooperation. Being able to work with many different kinds of personalities and break into established teams and cliques can be beneficial to a company. Knowing how to break in is even more of a prize.

Job Hoppers are Strategic Thinkers

Job hoppers aren’t all about luck, but rather strategy. Recent reports cite that the longer employees stay in a company, the less they get paid in comparison to their counterparts.  Employees who stay at a job longer than 2 years may earn as little as 50% less than their peers during the course of their career.  A job hopper isn’t content to simply make a 3% raise every year, but instead wants a bigger salary increase in a shorter amount of time. With this knowledge in mind, a job hopper actually seems the smarter candidate because of their strategic thinking.  Imagine how your company could harness this strategic mind!

They key to hiring a job hopper is to manage expectations.  A company should be aware up front that this is going to likely be a high performing employee who seeks top pay and increased responsibility in return.  This presents a unique opportunity for an employer to increase cross- training, to develop talent development programs and re-imagine opportunities for advancement that are more in line with today’s changing workforce.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

If Hiring Is Our Top Priority, Why Do We Keep Messing It Up?

Hiring Is Our Top Priority“Tell me about yourself.” “What is your greatest weakness?” “If you were me, why would you hire you?” “Where do you see yourself in five years?” Sound familiar? Of course it does. Chances are you’ve either answered or (yikes!) asked these worthless interview questions at some point in your career.

Let’s face it — most interviews are a real waste of time. Traditional interviews don’t identify the best workers. The strength of this type of interview is its ability to make the most expedient hire. And the proof is in pudding: High turnover, poor performance, silos, and sinking morale all plague companies that hire too quickly. These are symptoms of disharmony that are often grounded in poor hiring decisions.

Companies spend tremendous amounts of time and effort on business decisions like selecting a new piece of equipment or investing in a new technology. However, all too often, they don’t dedicate that same effort, energy, and time to hiring new people. Yet there’s nothing more important to a company’s success than hiring the best people.

Great leaders use highly selective hiring processes to identify the best people. They use processes that are highly predictive, that engage team members’ brainpower, and that raise the bar on expectations. Finally, they drive the process just like they would any other strategic initiative.

Here are four innovative approaches that great leaders use to hire the best people:

1. Raise the hiring standards. When you’re under pressure to fill openings, it can seem like the most important thing to do is to get anyone in the door to fill the gap. But now is not the time to lower your hiring standards; now is the time to raise them. And there’s no better way to raise hiring standards than by asking the people who are currently doing the job and will work alongside the new hire.

When you challenge current employees to define what they want in a new co-worker, in addition to related work experience, they’ll produce a long list of personal qualities, traits, and attributes. They may say they want an individual who’s team-oriented, honest, a self-starter, enthusiastic, a critical thinker, or a fast learner. These attributes become the high standard that candidates are measured against during the interview.

2. Adopt a peer interview process. Given that current employees have high standards and expectations for the performance of their teammates, it follows logically that they should be involved in the selection process. Not only will they maintain these high standards when making hiring decisions, but by owning the process and decision, they also have a vested interest in the new hire’s success.

Because current employees’ standards are so high, they frequently reject candidates referred to them through the prescreening process. But don’t despair; meeting their high standards is essential for creating a culture of high-performing workers.

The principles of the peer interview approach can be used when hiring at any level in the organization, from screening front-line employees to hiring scientists or selecting a top-level executive.

3. Interview for attributes. Most interviews focus on technical skills and past accomplishments. This type of interview is shallow and myopic. While you may be able to uncover whether they can do the job, you’re missing a critical factor: how they do the job.

Some time ago, service organizations realized that it was better to hire people who, as part of their nature, were polite and positive and liked solving problems for people. These people could be trained on the technical aspects of the job. This approach was much more successful in creating positive customer relations than the strategy of hiring people with the technical know-how and then training them to be nice to customers.

Adopt a behavioral-based process that screens for attributes — the very attributes that employees generated in the first step. Behavioral-based interviewing is 55 percent more likely to predict future behavior; traditional interviewing is only 10 percent accurate in predicting future behavior.

4. Use work simulations. Using behavioral-based interview questions will give you a glimpse into a person’s character. You must now confirm that he or she can perform as advertised using a work simulation.

Work simulations are used for top candidates after prescreening. They can either be done individually (if you were hiring a plant manager, for example) or as a group (if you were hiring 10 front-line operators). They focus on a series of tasks or activities that reveal how the person thinks, how she interacts with others, and how she expresses herself in new situations. These simulations are situational to the position, company, and organization’s unique culture. They are highly effective at identifying the best candidate.

Ronda Haskell, the co-owner of Jeda Polymers, has found success using this tactic. “I never knew you could learn so much about a person without asking a single question,” she said.

Great companies have great cultures. Great cultures are made up of great people, and great people are identified through highly strategic hiring practices. It doesn’t happen by accident, and it certainly doesn’t happen with a traditional interview. These four approaches buck conventional wisdom and radically depart from a business-as-usual approach. Don’t you think it’s time for hiring solutions that work?

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…