Category Archives: Passive Recruiting

Recruiting Passive Candidates in the Job Hopping Era

When we talk about talent acquisition, we typically use the active voice. HR leaders utilize data in the most effective ways. Recruiters pursue the best candidates via the latest technology. Sometimes we even go hunting…for purple squirrels, that is. And while it’s incredibly important for recruiters to stay (pro)active, there is a passive elephant in the room we need to discuss.

Approximately 75% of global candidates are considered passive job seekers. These people are employed, and not actively looking for new opportunities. If the majority of the workforce falls into the passive category, it’s safe to assume the majority of top quality hires are passive, too. In this post we’ll look at passive candidates in more detail, and why recruiters should pay close attention to them.

What Is A Passive Candidate?

Passive candidates are distinct from active ones in that active candidates are searching for a job. They may or may not be unemployed, but they are far more motivated than passive candidates. Which is part of what makes recruiting a passive candidate so difficult. Talent acquisition leaders have to make an extra effort not only to identify quality passive candidates, but also to reach out to them and establish a connection.

Today’s passive candidates are especially fickle. The economy is slowly bouncing back, and candidates of all ages have become used to more choice, more flexibility, and more control over every aspect of their lives. While a passive candidate may be thankful just to have a job today, the concept of job hopping has become so normal that the loyalty of staying with one company for years, even decades, no longer holds a person back from considering a new job.

And yet the number of passive candidates remains high. Familiarity may breed contempt, but comfort breeds complacency. Many passive candidates may be open to a new job, but as long as they have a steady paycheck and intriguing office gossip, they might not make the switch from active to passive. This is where engaging recruitment strategies need to step in.

Why Do Recruiters Want Passive Candidates?

Passive candidates are attractive to recruiters for many reasons. If they already have a job, they probably have skills and knowledge that are important to other employers. And being employed, they can already guarantee some level of experience in the work place. Plus, there is a good chance a passive candidate will not already be interviewing elsewhere when you find them.

And as the population ages, recruiters are finding passive candidates more likely to be Millennial workers than ever before. By the first quarter of 2015, the number of Millennial workers rose to 53.5 million, passing their Baby Boomer colleagues and catching up to Generation X, to make up 34% of the workforce.

Millennials are perhaps the most likely candidates to switch jobs sooner rather than later, and so recruiters would do well to focus on quality hires among this group. As of January 2014, the median tenure for employees of all ages was 4.6 years. But among workers ages 25-34 (34 is the high end of the Millennial age range today) that figure drops to 3 years. And it gets even lower among their younger counterparts.

Passive candidates are already attractive to recruiters. But if those candidates are more likely to be Millennials, and less likely to stay in their current job for the long term, HR leaders would do well to target them before someone else does.

Be the Company Passive Talent Wants to Work For

If a passive candidate is identified as a quality hire to your company, it’s time to get proactive. Forward-thinking recruitment strategies that can forecast future needs and extend engaging employer branding across all channels will be in the best position to attract passive candidates.

We already know passive candidates are not necessarily looking for a new job. On top of that, they may not have even heard of your company, or they might think you’re not hiring. Recruiters should focus on engaging passive candidates in a way that excites them about the company, and makes them want to learn more.

The strategy should be approached in a very inbound marketing type of way. It has to have elements of great content, nurture marketing, search engine optimization, social media marketing, and so on. Referral incentives are also a must here. Job seekers—passive or active—should be treated like any other consumer or potential buyer, which means you’ve got to be in the right (digital) place at the right time. Plus, recruiters have to be equipped with the skills to convert casual lookers into something more if given the opportunity.

No matter how you locate, and reach out to passive candidates, it’s important to remember how much your employer brand will play a role in the process. You can’t just turn your best side towards the camera and smile–passive candidates probably won’t approach you (unless enticed), and you definitely can’t expect them to do all the work for you. Being proactive means most things you do now will pay off in the future.download

Passive Candidates – The Holy Grail?

Passive vs. ActiveWe’ve all seen some hilarious job board applications with completely irrelevant experience to what we’re looking for. Funnily enough, a few months spent working in your dad’s mechanics probably won’t see you getting interviewed for a senior technical role with an $115K base salary. There are of course some great candidates on job boards but a lot of the time it’s easy to see that some people use job boards to ‘spam out’ their information to any job that’s on screen.

Would it be that surprising then that the most sought after candidates are passive? They have evidence of their competency, with proven experience. They are not just applying on job boards in their free time.

But if they are The Holy Grail, how you get hold of them? The passive candidate takes a bit of convincing… they don’t NEED to move. So how do you go about attracting them?

  • Proactively seeking passive candidates – Having a presence at trade fairs, being active on social media, interacting with your market.
  • The better the candidate is the pickier they can be with their next job – the proposition needs to be more than just a pay raise; it needs to offer something different.
  • Presentation is everything – A well-presented and modern company brand also helps make your proposition appealing to passive candidates.
  • An exciting and modern company culture, or a lucrative benefits package would help set an employer apart from the rest.
  • Little things that set you apart – employee perks & performance-based incentives are a good image-booster, or a solid company car scheme.

The recruiters that act smart, represent employer brands excellently, and manage key relationships thoroughly will always win the attention of the passive candidate.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with only qualified and verified professionals that we have vetted for each position you are looking to fill.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

What Is Gravitational Recruiting and How Can You Use It?

Gravitational RecruitingUs recruiters need to put more thought into trying to create Gravitational Recruiting. That is, recruiting that pulls in applicants (active and passive) like matter in space to the Earth or the Sun.

Currently, we have more of a mindset of just get something out there to be seen. As if, someone just seeing that our company has a job opening is enough to get someone to apply.

But, we cannot get too salesy and pushy, because people do not like to be sold to or recruited when they are not really looking (fairly happy).

How do we create Gravitational Recruiting?

Firstly, we need to market to the people who would think (if they knew more about your company and job) – “I really want what you have to offer in the job.” We need to know what they want, what is missing in their current roles, what their challenges are, what their problems are, etc. We need multiple targets, because we might be resolving multiple problems and one size does not fit all.

Secondly, we need to create emotion engaging messages that resonate with our targeted applicants. We need to show that we have what they have always wanted and they could be living the dream by working for us.

Thirdly, we need to use the right media that our targeted groups are at.

If you had a food truck, you would go where you knew there were starving crowds. Starving crowds is the targeted group, the food truck and marketing on the truck would show how they would be filled and get a great new flavor or experience coming to them, and where they set up (where the crowd is at) would be the media/location. What kind of marketing or sales would you need? You show up and people are pulled to your truck because they are starving and crave what you have.

To create Gravitational Recruiting, you need to figure out who are your targeted applicants and what are they starving for. Obviously, that is why the active candidates are so easy to target. They are pulled to you because they are starving for work and an income. So they come without much more than a job post that just says what the company wants. That is all that is needed and they are pulled in (by the gravity of their need).

What about passive candidates? You know, the people that say they are happy where they are at and try to get off the phone as soon as possible when you call. What are they starving for? It does not necessarily have to be about more money.

Could be a shorter commute or telecommute opportunity. Many candidates say they are looking because they are tired of the drive in (unless they are unemployed, and then they are more open to driving farther).

Could be less travel. Many contractors are tired of the 75% or 100% travel and want to settle down.

Could be a cause that your company serves. Nonprofits have been using this for years to attract talent at lower wages. For profit companies could stand for something and have a cause as well. Think of Ford in the early days. Their cause was to make cars affordable and accessible to all. Some people wanted to make that happen. Startups also often have an advantage here, because they are often trying to change the world in some way.

Could be specific experience that would be gained. Perhaps you are offering a manager position and someone would like to get into management for the first time. Perhaps you are offering a position that will get exposure to a technology they always wanted to work with. Perhaps you are offering a position in an industry that they have always wanted to work in. It is always difficult getting your first job in a new area, because so many managers want people who have been there and done that. So if you have a position that will allow someone who does not yet have the experience get into the position, you have something to offer.

Could be a benefit that could not be had anywhere else (or very rarely). Perhaps you have a dog-friendly office and a group that could be targeted are people with the skill-set you are looking for who have always wanted to bring their dogs to work. Perhaps your company has on-site day care, laundry services, banking, barber, car shop, etc…or agreements with nearby services so that employees can get their tasks done while at work. Has your company ever thought about hiring a concierge to help the company’s employees and make their lives easier?

Ask your current employees – why did you accept the position and come to work here…why do continue to work here…why do you stay? They will let you know what things they were starving for and how you are keeping them fed. It may be the commute, experience, etc, etc. With this information, you can target groups and create messages that will pull in others who are starving for the same things.

If you do a lot of digging and you still can’t find things in your company that people are starving for, then that might be the problem why you might be having a hard time attracting talent (especially top talent who are more demanding because they are in demand). If that is the case, then you need to work with management and the executives to start creating some things that will fulfill the targeted group’s needs and desires.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with only qualified and verified professionals that we have vetted for each position you are looking to fill.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

The Three Steps of Candidate Attraction

Candidate_AttractionImagine you own a retail store located well off the main road. Very few people drive by and as a result, you’re not selling much. You think if the store was more inviting, more customers would come. So you spend six figures on new shelving, better lighting and even hire a consultant to advise on traffic flow.

Not much changes.

So you decide to change your product signage making it easier for customer to understand and learn about the products you offer. You change the font and layout, and rewrite the product descriptions. You put an ad in the Penny Saver even though the only people who actually read it are retirees who don’t use your products.

The people who do wander into the store buy more so your head of Merchandising is convinced that you are spending money on the right things, but you are not so sure. Not enough people are coming into the store, and of the ones that do, most don’t have the resources to be serious buyers. Will spending more money on store signage really be the answer?

You don’t need a background in retail, or marketing or any other business discipline to understand that building customer traffic will require advertising. If customers don’t know the store is there, it doesn’t matter how well designed and stocked it is.

Now take this scenario to Talent Acquisition. You need more applicant flow so you spend the bulk of your budget on your career site adding videos and making it mobile friendly. That doesn’t seem to generate the quality candidates you want so you decide to rewrite your job descriptions and even post on several job boards.

When that doesn’t work, you seize on the data from Glassdoor and LinkedIn showing that candidates conduct job research on those sites. So you spend money on both of them.

Not much changes.

Generating candidates is a three-step process. When you break down the three steps, it becomes clear what outcome you will get from investments in each of the steps.

3 Steps of Candidate Acquisition

Step 1: Discovery

The first step is Discovery. Much like the retail store, candidates need to know your jobs exist. Right now there are approximately 5 million open jobs in the United States. Unemployment is at historical lows and very, very few qualified people are searching job boards looking for a job. Even fewer are randomly exploring corporate careers sites to see if they can find an appropriate job.

That doesn’t mean that a lot of job switching isn’t going on. People trade up their positions all the time. On average, 50 million people change jobs every year. If you want more of them to apply to you, you need to get your jobs in front of them. People discover jobs through a variety of channels: recruiters reach out to them, a friend calls or emails them, they see the job on social media, an employee refers them, or other serendipitous methods.

Once they discover a job that looks interesting and could be a good career move, they go to step 2.

Step 2: Research

Once their interest has been piqued, they want to know more about the job before they make the investment to apply. The Candidate Experience Research by The Talent Board shows that 76% of candidates conduct research before they apply. This is where the investment in your career site, Glassdoor and LinkedIn comes into play. Informative, interesting and positive information on these sites will keep candidates in your pipeline and advance them to step 3.

Step 3: Apply

The final step is Apply. For candidates who have maintained interest in the job, they are ready to invest the time and effort to apply. Having a streamlined, well-constructed and mobile friendly application will maximize your conversion from viewers to applicants.

If your goal is to increase your pool of applicants, spending money on the Research sites, including your own careers site, will only move the needle a little. Good research sites will keep interested candidates interested, but they do nothing to attract more candidates.

Moving the Needle

If you want to increase your candidate pool with more qualified candidates, you need to invest in the Discovery phase. Discovery requires outreach, advertising and promotion. Your content must be mobile friendly since candidates, especially Millennials, use their phones as their primary source of information. The information must be interesting and engaging since most candidates are not actively looking for a job and you need to entice them to consider yours. Video is the most effective medium for capturing candidates’ attention. And most importantly, you must make social sharing effortless for individuals. To put your job in front of the maximum number of qualified candidates, you must leverage the power of social media and make it easy for individuals to pass your jobs along to friends and colleagues.

If you want potential candidates to take action, your Discovery efforts must be job specific. General information about your company, culture and opportunities will not generate a response from individuals. The hook that prompts action is a specific job that is interesting and appealing to an individual. Potential candidates become aware of a job and immediately assess whether or not the job is a good career move and will advance their career. If the job looks promising, then the individual wants to know more about the hiring organization and they begin their Research phase. But without a specific job to focus the research, the process never advances.

Text-only job descriptions are yesterday’s technology and don’t interest today’s candidates. 

Best-in-class Discovery tools are:

  • Self-contained: candidates do not need to go to another source for basic information,
  • Engaging: include video welcoming message from the potential boss,
  • Sharable: social share buttons built in and
  • Compelling: highlight strengths of the job.

Understanding the three steps to candidate attraction, and the critical elements of each step, will help you assess your strengths and weaknesses, allocate your resources better and improve your results. With a well-disciplined approach, you can build an effective and consistent process that will generate the qualified candidates you need to achieve your recruiting goals.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with only qualified and verified professionals that we have vetted for each position you are looking to fill.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

5 Proven Methods to Improve Talent Sourcing

Talent SourcingIt can be quite a nightmare trying to find the perfect candidate for that new job opening at your company, and sometimes the person you want simply doesn’t exist.

There are a number of strategic checkpoints that you can constantly work on, and they can help ensure that you have a quality talent pool at your fingertips as soon as you’re ready to hire.

1. Start Talent Sourcing Before You’re Ready

Hiring takes a long time, and that’s unlikely to change. In fact, it’s a safe bet to assume that the waiting period is going to increase as technology enables hiring managers to become pickier. In June of 2015, DHI Hiring Indicators found that the average time to hire a new employee takes more than 27 days. However, this is across many industries, and more specific roles often take significantly longer.

One of the best ways to avoid this delay is to anticipate growth. That way, you’ll you have some candidates ready when you get the investment or make the change. You may not be able to have them start working the specific day you want, but the gap will be much shorter.

But, don’t take our word for it. Listen to this advice from the team at Impraise:

“Start recruiting even if you don’t have open spots! It can take a great deal of time to find the right candidates once you need them, so make sure you start looking for new talent way ahead.”

2. Keep a Watch List

Even if you don’t need to hire someone, start keeping a list of potential employees. This is especially useful for very specific roles. For example, if you come into contact with a talented mobile developer but don’t yet need an app, save their contact information for when you do.

Keeping this list will save time when you actually do need to hire. Instead of starting from scratch, you already have a short-list of candidates, and you can start moving forward with them.

You don’t have to contact these people when you find them, but sometimes that can save time. If you have an informational interview, you will now be on the candidate’s radar, and they might already have an internal desire to work for your company by the time there’s an opening.

Glassdoor did some research, and they found that phone interviews lengthen the hiring process by about 8 days, one-on-one interviews by about 5 days, and presentations by about 3 days. So, pre-screening a watch list can really, really work to speed things up.

3. Every Employee is a Recruiter

Studies routinely find that referrals have the highest interview to hire ratio of any hiring strategy.

Knowing this, don’t forget to empower your most valuable recruiters: your employees.

After all, with the exception of your HR department, it’s unlikely that the new hire will be working closely with the recruiter. So, isn’t it logical that the people who will actually be interacting everyday have a say? Friends of current employees are often a natural fit for the company culture, and they might even already have good relationships with their future co-workers.

Also, if you make an effort to work on your employer branding, potential hires get the impression that you care. Glassdoor found that 94% of people are likely to apply to a job if the company regularly updates their online image, such as responding to reviews or creating videos about employee life.

But, before you let your employees loose, set some ground rules. Tell them what they are (and aren’t) allow to say to potential hires. Plus, be very clear about any incentives they’re going to receive for recommending friends.

4. Maintain a Career Site on Your Website

Having a career site on your company website is an extremely valuable hiring tool. Many people looking at it are already interested in your company, so it takes less convincing work on your part. Plus, you have complete control over your image.

If you do this correctly, it will save your time. All you have to do is to let people know about your company culture, and they won’t apply if they don’t fit it.

5. Source Outside the Box

Like all other areas of running your business, don’t be afraid to do some innovative thinking about candidate sourcing.

Willem Wijnans (Sourcing Monk / Improbable) has highlighted some really clever methods that companies have used to attract talent. One company advertised inside online video games, another put a hiring notice on a billboard (in ASCII code) next to a competitor’s office, and it’s not unheard of to advertise hiring on the name of a WiFi network.

While most of these ideas are pretty specific (and tech related), using creativity can really put you ahead of your competitors.

As you can tell from all of the ideas listed above, candidate sourcing isn’t something you do when you have an open position and then stop. It’s an ongoing and constantly evolving practice, but it can save your company significant time and money if done right.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with only qualified and verified professionals that we have vetted for each position you are looking to fill.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

How the Improving Economy Is Making Hiring Harder

Portrait of a very happy young man in a rain of moneyFor workers, a growing economy means better jobs and the ability to choose between quality jobs to find that next career move. For companies, a growing economy means more revenue and more opportunities to grow. But a growing economy also means that there are less qualified workers looking for jobs, and the lack of quality employees due to the constantly improving economy is proving to be a huge challenge for companies around the country.

Many Companies Are Feeling The Recruiting Crunch

Yahoo! Finance published the findings of a report done in October 2015 that indicated that 48% of companies in the United States are finding it extremely difficult to fill positions with quality employees. That number is up from 45% in September 2015, and it is a number that continues to rise. The simple truth is that, as the economy continues to improve, recruiting is becoming more and more of a problem for American companies.

Who Is Feeling It The Most?

The tremendous growth in the service sector means that service companies are finding it the most difficult to attract new employees. Larger companies seem to have an advantage in attracting quality employees over small businesses because larger companies can offer higher wages, and larger companies can offer more competitive health benefits.

Investing In The Brand

According to a report done by LinkedIn, companies are combating the recruiting issue by investing more money in making their company brand more attractive. Many companies indicate that finding quality employees is more important than sales, which means that taking a sales approach is probably not a bad idea. By investing in the company brand image, it can be possible to attract more quality employees and increase the company’s chances of finding better recruits.

What Does This Mean For Employees?

The end result of an improving economy to companies means that companies make more money. But the concern in the past has been that an improving economy does not always mean that there will be higher wages for employees. This lack of quality employees is the worst that the job market has seen in nearly a decade. Most economists feel that the need for higher quality employees will cause companies to raise wages to attract those employees for future growth. The hope is that the increase in wages will start to appear soon and help the economy to grow even further.

A growing economy is great for companies and workers, but it becomes a burden to companies when the workers become difficult to find. It is during these economic times, when the employment is so low, that new methods of recruiting differentiate in talent acquisition.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with only qualified and verified professionals that we have vetted for each position you are looking to fill.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

Why Recruiting Has Become Marketing

Why Recruiting Has Become MarketingOver the years, recruiting has become marketing: it is not just about finding the right fit for your position anymore. Recruitment is about encouraging job seekers to apply for your company in the first place, but also about providing a positive candidate experience and retaining top talent. It is about conveying an authentic message out there to the public so that unsuccessful candidates do not feel rejected, and former employees still feel very strongly about their past employers.

Recruiting has become marketing because recruiters need to convince and sell, just like marketing folks do. Except recruiters do not sell what the company is producing, they sell the company itself: its corporate culture, values and mission, its workplace, its roles and advancement opportunities.

More than ever, human resources departments have to worry about employer branding and candidate experience. Companies do not only need to take care of their clients, they need to take care of their past and current employees as well as their past, current and future candidates. In other words, they need to take care of the public at large – or at least their target audience, whether for selling or hiring.

It is necessary to treat your current and future employees the way you would treat your clients. In fact, candidates and employees are like internal clients: they may not be interested in the products and services your company sells out to the world, but they still remain potential clients and active brand ambassadors, whether in a positive or negative way. As explained in the video below, today’s job seekers are in the driver seat. As a result, companies take employer branding and candidate experience more seriously. What most of them do not yet realize is that they need to start considering recruitment like an internal customer service.

Today candidates are more selective about the organizations they are willing to work for so that recruiters do not have sole power in the final decision when it comes to hiring. This makes the relationship between both parties more equal. If it is slightly unbalanced on the candidate side now, it is because the market tends to be candidate-driven rather than employer-driven. Since employers are no longer in a position of strength, companies have to consider candidates like clients.

But it takes quite the marketing skills to build up a strong and effective employer brand and offer simple and attractive application tools to the job seekers out there eager for an engaging but quick and easy candidate experience.

Because companies can offer relevant products and services to their clients based on data, recruiters should be able to do the same with candidates on employment websites and mobile apps. Just like marketing departments make plans and take actions to drive the client’s attention to their products or services, human resources should come up with targeted and engaging content and job offers.

A typical marketing strategy can be based on mobile, personalization and predictive advertising. A recruitment strategy is more similar to a digital marketing strategy today: it is about building awareness, engaging, nurturing and hiring. While the technology necessary is made available to us, it is more about our habits, behaviors and willingness to change our approach to recruitment.

Some companies will not have the time and money to invest on such major shifts, while others will. But it may be as simple as encouraging teamwork and collaboration between marketing and HR departments. It does not have to feel overwhelming: most companies with HR already have marketing departments. They just need to start working hand in hand more often.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with only qualified and verified professionals that we have vetted for each position you are looking to fill.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

Why Google’s Hiring Practices Are Ahead of the Curve

Google's Hiring ProcessGoogle is a name synonymous with innovation. From its search engine and advertising to its phones and online apps, the brand is one that seems to be forever forward-thinking, and this is apparent in its hiring strategies as well. Google candidates come from far and wide to try to become a part of the company, but many don’t know what they are getting themselves in for when it comes time to interview. What makes Google’s hiring practices so innovative?

Famous Interview Questions

For starters, the questions themselves are often unexpected and seemingly off the wall, but they serve a purpose. Famous examples include, “Why is a manhole cover round?” and “How many piano tuners are there in the entire world?” Now, these seem nonsensical, but what they do is show how a candidate thinks. Although Google is getting away from asking these types of questions, they allow the interviewer to see the candidate walk through a problem. Even if there is no right answer or if there are multiple right answers, the idea is to see the candidate in action.

People Are Paid Based on Talent

Many companies will try to distribute pay fairly evenly across specific departments or for similar titles. Google, on the other hand, bases pay on talent more than anything. So, if you are a programmer and your coworker is a programmer and both of you were hired on the same day, you might expect to make about the same thing. Working at Google, you and your coworker would be judged on your talents and what they bring to the company. Suppose your coworker was able to solve a difficult code issue that no one else in the department could do. In Google’s eyes, he’s more talented, and therefore more valuable.

Management Butts Out

Another problem that many employers and employees face is the role of management. Many managers forget what it was like to be an employee very quickly after being promoted, and this can lead to them sticking their noses into everything, slowing down productivity. At Google, the thinking is that people were hired to do their jobs based on their ability, and therefore, management should be involved as little as possible. If management is hiring the right people, there should be no need to micromanage.

Get the Team Involved

Google also uses committees to decide on candidates instead of allowing individuals to take care of things. The reason for this is that a single person may be having a really bad day or a really good day during the interview or when making the final decision. This can cause changes in perception of the candidate that may not be fair. By utilizing a group of people to make the decision, this eliminates potential bias. It also allows people who work at Google the chance to decide whether the candidate is someone they want to work with on a daily basis. Being stuck working with someone you don’t like is no fun!

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

Why Recruitment Needs Management Information

Recruitment Needs ManagementWith millions spent on recruitment every year, the importance of good information to guide you through the recruitment process is paramount.

Do you know how much you are spending on recruitment, do you know where it is being spent, and do you know if the money spent is getting the results you want? Good management information can tell you all of these things. The aim of management information is to get all of the facts in front of everyone.

Good management information can give you all of the facts you need to recruit the right people. For example, you have a recruitment process that has been ticking along nicely for several months with an average time to hire of 30 days, suddenly one month, it’s doubled to 60 days and continues at this pace for the following month. Where have the extra days come from? Is it the approval process, is it poor advertising response, or are you just busy recruiting for more jobs now than you were before?

With good management information you have immediate access to all of the information you need to find the problem and identify the areas in your process that are causing the delay, without having to spend many hours searching for the problem. You would be able to see how long the job took to be approved before recruitment could commence, which parts of the approval process took the time, how long it then took to advertise the roles, how good the response was for each advert, how long was spent screening all of the applicants, how long was spent interviewing and then how long it took to make the final decision.

Having access to all of this information not only allows you to quickly identify the cause of problems, it can also direct you in your decision making, allowing you to make your decisions based on facts rather than intuition and guess work. If your advertising costs are pushing up the cost of recruitment, then you can use the information provided to guide where to advertise. This can be both in general terms and more specific.

Any business trying to put this information together themselves can come across a number of barriers. All good management information starts with good data, and if the data is of poor quality then the information will be of poor quality.

Many companies use recruitment agencies, and it may not be in a recruitment agency’s best interests to let you know where they get their best candidates from because if you knew that, then you wouldn’t need the recruitment agency. Equally their systems are often not well suited to report on cycle times and recruitment ratios.

However, if engaging a recruitment process outsourcing supplier, dedicated to improving your processes, you should expect top notch reporting. It is in an RPO’s best interests to not only show you where your best candidates are coming from but also where you are losing potential candidates.

In the current climate there are many more people looking for work than a few years ago. Being able to target the better candidates can save time and money. Reporting can provide valuable insights in how to save money and improve the quality of candidates you can attract.

Masses of very significant data can be captured throughout the recruitment process, and can be used to gain valuable insights. Make sure that your data is working for you, and that your recruitment efforts are focused appropriately.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

How Can You Use the ‘Golden Hello’ to Help Attract Talent?

Signing BonusThe “golden hello” — more commonly known as a “signing bonus” — is back. Research from WorldatWork found that sign on bonuses were at an all-time high last year: 74% of employers were offering them, versus just 54% of employers back in 2010.

Not only are more organizations offering signing bonuses to new hires, but the bonuses are also being paid at higher rates. Executives have benefited most from this generosity, with 41% of them now receiving more than $50,000 in signing bonuses.

It’s not really surprising to see the rise of the signing bonus, as highly discerning employers are running out of ideas to attract top talent in a highly competitive market. The golden hello seems to offer a quick fix to the problem.

But, before we all start open our corporate purses and foisting thousands of dollars on hard-to-find candidates, it’s worth considering whether or not signing bonuses really do attract high-quality talent.

Little Direct Evidence Suggests That Signing Bonuses Will Actually Attract More Applicants

However, we could make a roundabout argument in support of the signing bonus. Several studies have shown that applicants are more likely to reply to job advertisement that clearly present pay. One would imagine that if a signing bonus was clearly presented in the job advertisement, that would make the role more financially attractive, thus drawing in more applicants.

However, this is a risky approach. A publicized signing bonus could make your business sound desperate, damaging your employer brand. It could also create resentment in existing employees who hadn’t received signing bonuses when they joined the company. Highly public signing bonuses might also encourage mercenary candidates to apply — you know, those candidates who care way more about the bonus than they do about your business.

If you are going to use signing bonuses as a talent acquisition technique, it might make sense to communicate these bonuses on a need-to-know basis.

Signing Bonuses May Help in the Negotiating Room

Using signing bonuses to attract talent may not be a great strategy. But that doesn’t mean signing bonuses are useless. In fact, the golden hello can be very useful at the negotiating table.

Signing bonuses can be used to offset any specific losses that a candidate may incur as a result of changing jobs, such as a reduced salary, a loss of benefits, or an increased commuting time. By easing the pain of these losses, signing bonuses can give hesitant talent the impetus to make the jump.

It seems clear that there are some real advantages to using a signing bonus in these talent-scarce times — but it should be used judiciously. Don’t go flaunting your signing bonuses in an attempt to woo talent. Instead, introduce the signing bonus quietly at the negotiation stage as a way to coax high-quality candidates over to your corner.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…