Category Archives: Specific Positions

US Contractors Gear Up For Recruitment Drive

Construction Workers Looking at RoofThe research by Associated General Contractors of America (AGC) and Sage Construction & Real Estate found that optimism is particularly high in Kansas.

The survey, conducted as part of The Challenges Facing a Growing Industry: The 2016 Construction Industry Hiring and Business Outlook, indicates that contractors foresee a positive year despite tight labor conditions, regulatory burdens and IT security challenges.

“The construction industry will continue to recover in 2016 as many firms add to their headcount amid growing demand in a range of private and public sector markets,” said Stephen Sandherr, the association’s chief executive officer. “The industry also faces a number of challenges that have the potential to dampen, and possibly even undermine, the sector’s recovery.”

Association officials noted that 71% say they will increase their headcount in 2016. In most cases, however, that hiring will only lead to modest increases in the overall size of firms. 63% of firms report their planned hiring will increase total headcount between 1% and 25% while 8% report they will expand their headcount by more than 25% this year.

Among the 30 states with large enough survey sample sizes, 95% of firms in Kansas plan to expand their payrolls in 2016 – more than in any other state. In contrast, 25% of firms in Pennsylvania report they plan to reduce headcount this year.

Contractors expect a mix of private and public sector market segments will drive demand for construction in 2016. As measured by the net positive reading – the percentage of respondents who expect a market segment to expand versus the percentage who expect it to contract – respondents are most optimistic about the outlook for retail, warehouse and lodging (21% net positive).

Respondents were also positive about the outlook for hospital (19% net positive), private office (19%), multifamily residential (14%) and higher education (13%) construction. And they are optimistic about the prospects school (12%) and public building (12%) construction, particularly in contrast to last year when contractors were generally pessimistic about all public construction market segments.

Contractors are less optimistic about other segments, including manufacturing, other transportation power and direct federal construction market segments. However, association officials noted that the survey was completed prior to enactment of federal legislation to increase funding for highways, transit and direct federal agency spending, and to extend the expiry date for wind, solar and other tax provisions helpful to construction.

Construction firms continue to cope with shortages of available workers, reporting that they are having a hard time finding either salaried or craft professionals. And 69% of respondents predict that labor conditions will remain tight, or get worse, during the next 12 months. Firms are responding to worker shortages by increasing pay and/or benefits. 49% of respondents report they have increased base pay rates, 30% report they are providing incentives and/or bonuses and 23% report they have increased their contributions to employee benefits to retain or recruit workers. And nearly half of firms report they plan to increase their investments in training and development compared to 2015.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with only qualified and verified professionals that we have vetted for each position you are looking to fill.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

Employer Branding in the Agriculture Industry

Employer Branding in the Agruculture IndustryThe agricultural industry is growing to meet demand, and in order to keep up with that demand, talented employees are needed. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a sufficient number of resumes of only qualified candidates to fill your next role? Unfortunately for most, this just doesn’t happen.

More than 60% of agribusinesses expect up to 10% of their staff to retire in the next two years. When AgCareers.com surveyed students, only 12% reported that their peers in other degree programs outside of agriculture see the industry in the same positive light that ag students do. When you consider the number of youth entering the overall workforce compared to those expected to exit, there is a large gap and the competition for talent is becoming fiercer than ever.

Develop Your Brand

Overcoming this gap and increasing the pipeline begins with branding your organization. Employer branding, like product branding, is about perception and in this case about the employee experience at your organization. Reputation means a great deal to candidates. When asked specifically about company brand/image, nearly 80% of job seekers indicated that the company brand/image was important or very important in selecting which jobs to apply for.

Many people associate employer branding with expense. There are tactics involving some expense, and often there is people resource/time, but employer branding does not have to be costly. For example, develop a standard follow-up procedure for applicants that apply to your job openings. The number one complaint AgCareers.com hears from job seekers is that they don’t hear from the employer after submitting their application. At the very least, set-up an automated response to let candidates know you have received their resume and when you expect to get back in touch with them or fill the position.

Depending on the size of your operation, other actions can be taken to impact employer brand, like a website that has a clear career section or a description that allows potential applicants to know how to apply to positions. There are also advertisements and career fairs. The key is to make sure your organization is getting the most out of these avenues. For example, does the job description convey the employment brand with a brief description about the organization? Are you sending the right person to represent your business at career fairs – someone who can really sell the organization?

There are also logistical aspects to consider when focusing on attracting talent. As you develop job descriptions for the roles for which you’re recruiting, involve the manager/supervisor. Seek input on actual job functions and try to articulate the role and responsibilities as closely as possible. Limit the qualifications to those that are required or preferred. It is easier to be broad in this area and screen for the ‘would like to haves’ after you’ve seen all of the applicants. Include a specific location when possible, as well as a salary range. If the salary range is negotiable, that is acceptable to include. Be sure the description is current and legitimate if you reuse a job description.

Plan Ahead

As often as possible, forecast your recruitment needs, and consider several options for reaching potential applicants. Word-of-mouth and networking remain the most effective means of sourcing talent within the industry, but casting a wider net through online job board advertising and corporate websites. A long-term strategy could include reaching out to those who might influence career decisions, such as high school teachers and counselors as well as university and community college faculty.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

A Recruitment Conundrum for Small Businesses

Big Data Small Business

What does big data mean to start ups and small businesses? We read a lot these days about how big data will create new growth opportunities and how it will create sustainable competitive advantage, providing the means for companies to outperform their peers.

But we also read that big data requires vast investments in big data frameworks, analytical software, data warehouses and data scientists who can build complicated models to guide companies through the maze. The size of these investments often exceeds the financial abilities of many small companies.

So, does that mean big data lies outside the realm of small business? Not at all.

The December 2013 issue of the Harvard Business Review contained a very interesting paper titled ‘You May Not Need Big Data After All’. One of the arguments put forward by authors, Jeanne Ross, Cynthia Beath and Anne Quaadgras, was that many companies don’t know how to make the most of the data they already have embedded in their core operating systems. They invest heavily in big data but fail to get a satisfactory return on that investment. Until executives learn how to use data and analysis to support their operating decisions, they will not be in a position to benefit from big data.

For all companies, the starting point is to develop a culture of evidence-based decision-making. For years, we have used market research to compete more effectively in our marketplace. What has changed significantly is the substantial increase in the source of our data. We are now creating new information 50 times faster than we did ten years ago, generating a staggering 2.5 exabytes of data every day and the volume is growing. Still, the need for evidence-based decision-making has not changed.

Keeping abreast of technology

There is no doubt that with the volume of data being generated, as well as the different formats of the data (structured and unstructured), companies will need to make changes to the way they operate if they are to take advantage of this new-found wealth of intelligence. With the rapid advances in technology, business leaders must ensure that management practices keep abreast of their technology platforms. This will certainly require the hiring of appropriately qualified and experienced staff, plus an investment in training and development programs.

But small business doesn’t need to compete head-on financially with big business for people like data scientists, data architects or PhD data analysts. Compensation is important, but for those with moderate human capital budgets, there are a number of areas where small business leaders can succeed.

First, data gurus are motivated to work in an environment where they are constantly challenged, in companies that are innovative, have highly interesting data sets and are willing to invest in the new technologies. Large companies can pay top market rates for a data scientist, but if the job is boring or they feel their skills are not being fully utilized, they will move on quickly, seeking more nimble and agile workplaces where they can be closer to the decisions.

What also sets top data specialists apart is their curiosity. They are always looking for patterns in data that seem invisible to others. It may take them some time to develop appropriate algorithms to enable them to detect these patterns, but eventually they will find them and the rewards will be substantial. Appealing to this inquisitiveness increases the recruitment and retention success rate. Most importantly, they need (like anyone) to feel valued, allowing them to participate in the decision-making process rather than being hidden away in a dark corner, allows them to feel valued (and also gives the company even better insight).

The surge in demand for data scientists has been well documented and the number of people with deep analytical experience is shrinking. One effective option for small businesses is to recruit at the level of experienced data or software engineer. What these people may lack in mathematical theory and data modeling techniques is often more than made up for by being grounded in the real world.

The big data highway

Good data engineers will have the experience to understand big data analytics applications, take the data insights generated and turn them into operational reality. Many will also be experts with big data frameworks such as Hadoop and Spark, along with scale-out NoSQL databases such as MongoDG, Counchbase and OrientDB. These skills will be sufficient to get small businesses effectively started down the big data highway.

Developing an effective data platform is not simply a matter of obtaining the intelligence from a variety of different sources and undertaking the appropriate analysis, but ensuring data quality standards are maintained, getting the material into the right formats that will enable evidence-based decisions and getting the information to all relevant personnel in the organization quickly.

There are skilled people other than just data scientists who can provide the right big data support for small businesses, even though in the longer term, business leaders may need to provide the necessary training and development to take these people to the next level.

The key, however, is to act sooner rather than later. With the numbers of available top-end data scientists across the globe diminishing, skilled data engineers will be next on the list. And when you are successful in your recruitment, ensure that you do everything to hang on to your talent.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

3 Ways to Attract Top Tech Talent

3 Ways to Attract Top Tech TalentBusiness success in the tech industry depends on attracting highly skilled employees, and it’s challenging for hiring managers to find themselves competing against other companies to win the interest of the best candidates.

The President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology predicts a drastic shortage of over 1 million tech workers in the decade between 2012 and 2022; if these statistics reflect anything even close to real-world numbers, that means these job-seekers (especially the ones with high-level skills) have the ability to pick and choose among employers. In order to build and maintain a solid talent base, you need to know what qualities in a company matter most to job seekers in the tech field. Below is a quick overview of how to make your company be more desirable to applicants.

1. Facilitate a Healthy Work-Life Balance

When millennials were polled about their career hopes, a satisfying work-life balance was consistently mentioned as the number one priority. No other workplace quality mattered more than this to young workers looking to start their careers. What does this mean for you in terms of establishing policies? Essentially, it translates into embracing flexibility. Attractive policies may include allowing workers to set their own hours, in order to accommodate family demands. Many employers offer the option of working from home, at least some of the time. Other ways to help employees balance their job and family needs include on-site childcare and recognition that working overtime does not produce positive outcomes.

2. Challenge Your Workers

Skilled workers in the United States place “being challenged” high on their wish list of qualities for the ideal job. This doesn’t mean imposing long, exhausting workdays, however. Instead, “being challenged” refers to making use of the employee’s full skillset, so that he or she gains an increased sense of being valued through solving difficult problems. One way that employers facilitate workers using their highest and best skills is to offer training opportunities. Supporting your staff to upgrade their knowledge will win loyalty as well as give you a more effective workforce. Tech employers recognize this reality, and corporate training expenditures rose by 15% in 2013.

3. Integrate Marketing and HR

Your company’s marketing professionals are abundantly familiar with the methods of sharing information that will draw customers to your product or service. These are your in-house experts at branding, and part of your job as a hiring manager is to promote your employer brand. Linking the know-how of your marketing staff with the HR managers — responsible for creating and publishing job listings — is a good way to make sure that your jobs reflect the true appeal of your company as an innovative, appealing employer.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

3 Things to Look for When Hiring a Business Analyst

Business AnalystMany questions come up when going down the path of hiring a Business Analyst. What does the role entail? How do you know you’re getting someone who’s going to become a truly integral part of your team?

It’s tough to answer these questions when the definition of “business analyst” can go in so many directions. Here’s how Wikipedia defines it:

“Someone who analyzes an organization or business domain (real or hypothetical) and documents its business or processes or systems, assessing the business model or its integration with technology.”

The International Institute of Business Analysis (IIBA) describes a Business Analyst as “a liaison among stakeholders in order to understand the structure, policies, and operations of an organization, and to recommend solutions that enable the organization to achieve its goals.”

And here is a standard Business Analyst job description:

1. Description
– Meet with stakeholders to define requirements and project priorities.
– Identify impact of proposed changes on end-user experience, functional departments, systems and business process.
– Clearly document the requirements, incorporating flow charts, wireframes, or other visual aids, as needed, for both technical and non-technical stakeholders.
– Define current and future states and identify gaps.
– Act as SME for the project to various internal groups, such as engineering, QA, and analytics.

2. Requirements
– Ability to work with a variety of stakeholders who have different levels of technical expertise.
– Adept at interviewing individuals and groups regarding their business requirements, successfully collaborating to define functional requirements and assign priority.
– Demonstrated ability to employ diplomacy and strategic thought leadership to effectively resolve challenges and architect solutions.
– Proven ability to translate complex and potentially ambiguous information into professional deliverables that can be used to obtain stakeholder approval with minimal guidance.
– Exceptional oral and written communication skills.

Looking at these definitions, it can be a challenge to know whether or not the Business Analyst you hire is actually delivering value. After all, what exactly is “diplomacy and strategic thought leadership?” Talk about “potentially ambiguous information…”

3 Specific Skills Shared by Every Great Business Analyst

For a more specific look into the skills that all great Business Analysts (BAs) share, consider the following:

1. Great BAs communicate like they care.

This goes both ways: as they’re learning about a new initiative, picking up a new skill, or working with the local SME on a subject crucial to their work, you’ll see great BAs nodding along with a glint in their eye. They love to learn, and it’s easy to teach them because they’re enthusiastic and excited about the prospect of adding to their knowledge base. They also tend to be excellent listeners even if they’re not learning something new. They naturally respect other’s opinions and genuinely want to help bring together various points of view.

When it’s their turn to talk, that same excitement and enthusiasm makes them a joy to listen to. They tend to get thoughts across clearly and – more often than not – are able to persuade others to follow along with their take on the subject. This isn’t just generic “exceptional oral and written communication skills.”

It’s because they care.

2. Great BAs are naturally proactive and curious in their entire approach to the job.

When new to the organization, a great BA isn’t going to wait to be handed a pile of references to read. They’re likely to poke around the company wiki and other resources on their own just to quench their thirst for information. In meetings and conference calls, they’ll be asking plenty of questions, and their questions are smart. When they get to the point of offering status updates on projects and processes, it isn’t a simple “here’s what’s happening now.” Instead, it is backed up with “and here’s what I’m doing about it,” which turns their analysis into actionable insights.

3. Great BAs knows they aren’t an island. Their entire thought process is about win-win for the whole team.

A great BA loves to work in a team and views his role as integral to the team’s success. Likewise, he views the team’s success as necessary for his own. There is a mutual desire to improve and achieve a common goal. Using this deeply held belief, the great BA tends to be well-liked and relied upon by all on the team rather than being viewed as an outsider sent by management to check up on things.

So, if you’re tasked with hiring a Business Analyst and want to make sure you’re getting the best person for the job, keep your eyes peeled for the man or woman who excels in these three areas. Then, train them to be the perfect BA for your organization.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

5 Ways to Effectively Interview and Hire an Engineer

Hiring EngineersThe market for hiring engineers is more competitive than ever. For recruiters, one of the most frustrating things to see happen is having a great client, who’s hiring for a tough-to-find position, miss out on qualified candidates because of an inefficient hiring process. Many companies have lengthy technical interviews, as well as take home tests, but the most important thing to keep in mind with these job seekers is that they are not interviewing exclusively with you! They are usually working with multiple recruiters/hiring managers that are pushing them to take their jobs as well. With that said, often times the company that moves the most efficiently with their interview process is the one who gets the candidate.

Many times job seekers, even those that are extremely talented and senior, will say, “I just want to accept the first job offer I get, I hate taking off work to go to interviews.” No matter how much we encourage candidates to weigh their options and see a few different companies, sometimes the first company that makes an offer does end up being the best fit.

Below are some tips for managers who are urgently trying to fill positions, but aren’t seeing any results:

1.   Don’t be too critical of a candidate’s resume.

Being too judgmental of the resume’s formatting, spelling, etc. may cost you a great candidate. A candidate that has the skill sets you are looking for is worth a phone call, even if it only lasts ten minutes. I have seen managers hire candidates that they originally passed on because their resumes didn’t reflect their passion, attitude, and intelligence. If the candidate is extremely job jumpy, it is always worth a phone call to understand why s/he has left those particular jobs. Sometimes their reasons are very justified. For example, start-ups frequently do lay-offs when they are growing, so this could be a cause.

2.   Keep the interview process thorough, but efficient.

Company #1 that does three phone interviews with three different people before physically bringing in a candidate is probably going to lose out to Company #2 that does one phone interview, and then brings them in right after to see the space. Company #2 will be able to make an informed decision faster, and effectively make an offer faster. This is a candidate’s market, and they have many options when it comes to new jobs. A company that has a two-month long hiring process will lose out on candidates to the companies that can simply act quicker.

3.   Do not extend offers in the actual interview.

Candidates are usually very emotional or nervous at the end of the interview process, and they could use a day to decompress. If you extend something official to them the same day as the interview, they will usually accept an offer in person because they are caught off guard and excited, and then decline later because the offer isn’t quite what they are looking for.

4.   Keep the interviews organized and don’t miss phone calls.

Candidates become very discouraged when they take time out of their day to take a phone call and never receive one. This can hurt their impression of your company in the long run as well.

5.   Be open in terms of your budget.

If you are working with a third-party recruiting solution, be honest, and let them know what number to stay under when they submit candidates. Interviewing candidates that are way over the budget can end up being a waste of time for everyone, and frustrating for the manager. If you are realistic about what you can offer a candidate, then you will be more efficient with your interview process and save time!

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

What To Look For When Hiring SAM Professionals

http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-images-cloud-computing-concept-image29602089Hiring individuals to take control of your software asset management can be a complex process. It often involves a lengthy effort to find exactly the right person with the ideal set of skills and experience. There is the difficulty of recruiting from an extremely small group of people with the correct skills set, as well as the need for people to have experience of working with specific vendors.

A Specific Skillset

For businesses that are looking to recruit in the software asset management sector, it’s important to spend time searching for the right people. Once they are in place, you need to invest in adequate equipment, IT asset management and training to ensure that they can carry out their roles effectively.

The issue with recruiting SAM professionals is that this area covers a broad range of skills, and not all of these are IT based. When you’re starting the recruitment process, you need to decide on what your future objectives are before you begin searching for candidates. This will likely influence the type of person you are looking for and provide a focus for the skills that are most important to your business.

An Effective SAM Professional

In order to be an effective SAM professional, an individual will need to have the basic principles in place. These can then be adapted to suit the particular business, but without them they will not be able to put the right tools and controls in place to manage your software assets.

They must have a key understanding of the latest technology such as inventory management software, software license management and relevant SAM tools. This will enable them to focus on the tools that are required by the business. Understanding technology will mean that they can improve the sourcing of new equipment and help them keep track of the costs.

SAM professionals also require a knowledge of the company they are working within. They need to know what is required for the business to operate successfully, what areas they can work without and where costs can be reduced.

Financial management is a vital component of any role within a business, but it becomes even more crucial when purchasing technology. An effective Software Asset Manager needs to know what items offer the best value for money and take a strategic approach to purchasing.

This also leads into the requirement to be able to negotiate and communicate successfully. They must be able to work closely with suppliers and understand the bidding process so that they can purchase the right equipment at the best price. Within SAM it’s necessary to work across the organization, including communicating with key members of the management team so that they understand the process of acquiring new assets.

A large part of SAM is having an in-depth knowledge of the legal process and what the implications for the business would be if they didn’t comply with regulations. This also needs to be imparted to the management team so that they’re aware of how important SAM is.

Finally, a good SAM professional will have an analytical brain to enable them to solve issues and propose the most logical answer.

Recruiting new software asset management employees is not a quick process, and it’s vital that you make the correct decision. Finding the right person is easier if you can recruit a team to run your SAM. However, the process becomes considerably harder if you require just one person. Understanding your requirements will enable you to focus on the areas that are important to the business.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

4 Ways to Improve Your Driver Recruitment Process

Hiring DriversOne challenge the logistics sector faces is, well, finding new faces. While the U.S. recession largely suppressed a dormant truck driver shortage, the prospects of economic recovery are stirring old concerns. Adding to the problem, recent government mandates including the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s Hours of Service and Compliance, Safety, Accountability rules threaten to shrink the available pool of qualified drivers, and complicate recruiting, training, and retaining valued employees.

Creating a proactive corporate-wide program for recruiting drivers brings a number of benefits. It demonstrates a company’s commitment to human resources, as well as customer service. Service providers and private fleet owners can use such investment as part of their value proposition to customers. Increasingly, the human asset is becoming just as important as the physical ones.

Whether a company is looking to reduce driver turnover costs or vet a business partner to make sure it has the necessary resources to deliver acceptable customer service, maintaining a dedicated recruitment and retention strategy communicates a strong message both internally and within the extended value chain.

Try the following points to create a proactive driver recruitment environment:

  1. Highlight driver job benefits. It is important to highlight and celebrate the corporate culture, values, and benefits that make working for your company great. Managers need to be aware of everything the company has to offer, and communicate those advantages to existing drivers and prospective hires.
  2. Talk about compensation. Two-way communication must exist between management and drivers so all parties understand performance expectations, and share in both successes and failures. Silence breeds speculation and unease.
    Have managers regularly review location pay studies and current monthly pay averages for drivers to help set goals and provide incentive. Know your drivers’ weekly and annual gross pay—and ensure they are aware of how well they are compensated for providing great service to your customers. For new employees, set expected weekly hours and annual pay range for their first year of employment. Design your pay packages to make sure drivers make enough money, so they won’t be lured by competitor claims of better compensation.
  3. Know the competition. Drivers won’t know how good their job is if you don’t. Evaluate how industry at large compares in terms of hours, benefits, and pay. Develop a target list of competitors in the local market, organize by priority—whether it’s vertical, services, or individual company—then narrow your research focus. Once you know who you’re competing against for drivers, develop a plan for acquiring competitive pay/benefits data—i.e., managers surveying drivers to gather information about past employment, and talking with business partners and customers. With this level of local market analysis, you can better understand where capacity stands and whether you are positioned to stay ahead of the curve.
  4. Invest in recruiting. It is difficult for companies to simply rely on newspaper ads and word-of-mouth referrals to fill their driver needs. You have to become more creative and resourceful in how you target new hires. Consider circulating around truck stops referral flyers and cards that detail the benefits your company provides versus the competition. Also educate your drivers on how they can screen potential applicants and increase their chances of earning a referral bonus. Drivers can often be the best recruiters.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

The DOs and DON’Ts of Recruiting Physical Therapists

Early Physical TherapyOrthopedic groups face many challenges in providing in-office physical and occupational therapy (PT/OT) to their patients—but attracting highly skilled, motivated therapists shouldn’t be one of them. Therapists employed by orthopedic groups have an extremely high retention rate, and the vast majority report high levels of professional and personal satisfaction.

The following recruiting DOs and DON’Ts should help you attract, hire, and retain talented therapists.

Recruiting Dos

  • Point out the advantages of working within your physician group, such as a stable, secure position, benefit package, ready source of patient referrals, support for continuing medical education (CME), and the ability to develop and implement new programs that are economically feasible to meet the needs of patients and the practice. Collaboration and a team approach to care can result in better clinical outcomes and higher patient satisfaction.
  • Clarify the candidate’s position on working within a physician group. The American Physical Therapy Association has a long-standing policy against physician-owned PT and many therapists are under the mistaken impression that orthopedic groups offer PT/OT solely to profit from referrals. Pass on candidates who express any objection or voice even a minor concern.
  • Match or exceed the benefit packages offered by other therapy practices in your area. Therapists are accustomed to receiving three weeks of paid vacation, plus paid holidays and paid CME days per year. Therapists often place a priority on work-life balance, travel, and recreation, and your benefit package should address those priorities. Offer a productivity-based bonus plan that rewards therapists who reach target levels of productivity. You may even want to consider guaranteeing a portion of the bonus for the first year of employment.
  • Provide flexible work hours, as long as patient needs are met. Many therapists prefer a 4-day week (10-hour days) or three 10-hour days and two 5-hour days. However, patient needs—not therapist preference—should dictate the schedule and hours of operation.
  • Give more weight to a positive attitude and strong work ethic than to managerial experience when hiring for a director position. The primary responsibility of a PT/OT director should be to treat patients and serve as the clinical supervisor. Let your administrative staff handle administrative tasks. Therapy directors should typically spend about 90 percent of their time treating patients.
  • Hire lead therapists for each PT/OT location with more than three providers. It is difficult for a treating therapist at one location to effectively manage other locations.
  • Conduct a Fraud and Abuse Control Information System (FACIS) check. Make sure the candidate has an active license and no record of disciplinary actions. If the candidate has disciplinary complaints or sanctions, obtain copies of the complaint and all associated documents and ensure that the candidate has an acceptable explanation, can be covered by your professional liability carrier, and can be credentialed with all significant payers. Talk to at least three professional references, including at least one former supervisor.
  • If you have three or more full-time equivalent therapists, set up a PT/OT student intern program so that you have the inside track on recruiting new graduates. If the local PT/OT school is reluctant to send students to a physician group, approach the school about changing its policy.

Recruiting DON’Ts

  • Don’t overpay therapists. You should not need to pay more than the prevailing compensation rate for therapists in your area, and those figures should be readily available.
  • Don’t hire a candidate to simply fill a position. Too many orthopedic groups settle for less-than-stellar candidates because they are under pressure to fill the position. A therapist who does not have good clinical and communication skills and a strong work ethic will not be an asset and can negatively impact the productivity of the entire clinic. Wait for the right candidate.
  • Don’t (ordinarily) hire a therapist who currently spends more than half of his or her time performing managerial tasks. These candidates rarely wish to spend a substantial portion of their time treating patients.
  • Don’t (ordinarily) hire the owner of a local PT/OT practice. If these candidates had good clinical and managerial skills, they would have developed a successful private practice and would not be looking to work for someone else.
  • Don’t let relationships get in the way. For example, if one of the physicians recommends a therapist, the therapist should not report to that physician. A therapist who reports to a physician or goes to a physician with compensation or other employment concerns is a red flag.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, are available in your location and have agreed to your salary range.

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

5 Ways to Attract Top Engineers to Your Startup

Hiring EngineersThese days, if you are a small technology startup, hiring great engineers can be cutthroat and close to impossible. Here’s how to hire top engineering talent:

1. Present a tough engineering challenge that has not been solved before.

Money can motivate engineers, but the opportunity to work on a specific technical challenge is something money can’t buy. Explain the difficult problem that will keep your potential employee engaged for years to come. Highlight the challenge, and the engineer you want may choose your company over a job working on the Facebook newsfeed or Google’s search results.

2. Do not recruit from big-name companies like Facebook or Google.

It’s just too difficult. These engineers are already making serious money, and they likely have offers from other startups. Instead look for raw talent you can mold into something great.

3. Work with new programming languages that have a loyal following.

Since they are tinkerers and hackers at heart, engineers want to work with new languages. When an application like Node.JS or Ruby on Rails gains steam, engineers often start learning them in their spare time. The chance to use them at work is enticing. Older companies likely don’t use these hot new languages.

4. Look in online communities for people with similar interests.

We often look at communities where engineers are showing off side projects or concepts that they are passionate about. For designers it might be somewhere like Forrst or Dribbble. For engineers, look at places like Github to see who has created something cool. The best engineers aren’t floating their résumés around. They’re creating great projects to show off to the world.

5. Attract entrepreneurs by making your company their next thing.

Another challenge: Great engineers often want to start their own startup, especially nowadays, when launching a product and raising capital is easier than ever before. Tell potential hires to make your company “their next thing,” as if it were their own startup.

Zero Fee Recruiter is a new and better way to find great talent.

We are the world’s largest passive candidate marketplace. We provide you with qualified professionals that we have contacted and vetted for each position you are looking to fill. We deliver only candidates that are interested in the position, that are available in your location and that have agreed to your salary range. 

ZFR focuses on passive candidates that we source through our proprietary system, “Reach Out”, and this enables our team to reach candidates that are not actively looking.

We guarantee results! It’s that easy…

Yes, Our team is USA based!